• e-Health 2019 Conference Program

    Celebrate, Grow & Inspire Bold Action in Digital Health - Toronto, ON

    This product offers access to the e-Health 2019 Keynote / Plenary Presentation Live Webcasts, the recording of these 4 sessions and access to all PDF/Presentation Slides of each conference presentation.

    Group Discounts Available for 5+ Purchases. Contact us to request group pricing.

    PDF's of presentation PowerPoints are now online!

    Presentation Date(s):
    • May 26 - 29, 2019
    • Total Presentations: 146
Filter Results:

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    PS02 - Collaboration for Informed Patient Care

    • 15:45 - 16:45
    • 5/27/2019
    • Location: Area 1
    • Type: Panel Session
    • Track:
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      PS02.01 - Making It Work - Creating a Pediatric EHR Hub

      15:45 - 16:45  |  Author(s): Helen Edwards

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      SickKids and CHEO, through the Kids Health Alliance (KHA,) have been working together for the past two years to develop a structure that has enabled them to share the same platform for their EHR. Despite different implementation timelines and organizational objectives, this goal has been met. We believe this is unique in comparison to other “Hubs” as our partnership is based on alignment from a patient population and clinical perspective as opposed to geographical proximity. This work was done to support the strategic direction of KHA, which is to improve care for the pediatric population across Ontario. The challenge that we are now faced with is how to operationalize the structure given that we have two different application support teams and both organizations have their own unique strategic directions and stakeholder requirements. A key factor in the success of this partnership was the development of a governance structure both at the KHA leadership level as well as the application leadership level. We will continue to use and build on this governance to ensure continued success.


      Methodology/Approach:
      We will approach the discussion based on our implementation experience and lessons learned.


      Finding/Results:
      We will present our structure for shared roles including: · A shared training manager - whose mandate is to align training across organizations to ensure a consistent training approach, with shared resources and materials · Application analysts - we will show how the teams currently works together and how we will optimize these roles to create efficiencies that will allow for benefits to both organizations · Technical infrastructure teams - a shared team supports the technical environments. We will share how these teams work together to support the primary site (located in Toronto) and the disaster recovery site (located in Ottawa) We will provide and discuss examples of how we will work together on upcoming projects. Specifically related to a 2018 Upgrade of the EHR, Special Updates that occur approximately every 8 weeks and shared build decisions that we need to align on for each application (e.g. ED, Inpatient, Outpatient) - We will include examples of how the need for shared build decisions has facilitated opportunities to align clinical care and best practices. Included in the discussion will be our strategy for developing a shared roadmap as we roll out more modules, features and functionality


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      As with any endeavour of this scale there are many lessons learned which we will share and use to improve our process. Some of the key areas of challenge include: · Change control - keeping the system safe as teams are working in it. Challenges with communication since teams are located at different organizations · Timeliness of decisions - the need for a solid prioritization process and decisions matrix to ensure decisions are made efficiently and in a timely manner. Differences in clinical practices between the two organizations that require discussion and alignment on system build We will highlight areas where groups are working well together and use that experience to inform our approach moving forward.


      140 Character Summary:
      The session will highlight opportunities, challenges and risks as we leverage a shared EMR to support clinical care and decision making.

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      PS02.02 - Empowering Patients with Digital Self-Care: From Pilots to Province-Wide

      15:45 - 16:45  |  Author(s): Rhonda Wilson

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      In partnership with over 12 health service providers in 5 LHINs in Ontario, the Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) implemented and evaluated three models of “digital self-care” in the area of diabetes, mental health, and chronic kidney disease through a Canada Health Infoway (CHI) funded project. To determine efficacy and potential for scale, OTN partnered with the Women’s College Hospital Institute for Health System Solutions and Virtual Care (WIHV) to rapidly evaluate the tools and inform a provincial roll-out. One of these three solutions (Big White Wall) is now available for anyone with mild to moderate anxiety and depression in Ontario.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Instead of a traditional RCT, an innovative, non-traditional approach was applied to the evaluation, which was integrated and multi-stakeholder. The evaluation was an active piece of the implementation, in place of the typical analysis that takes place at pilot conclusion. Efforts were made to generate the data as quickly as possible using a mixed-methods approach. This practical rapid cycle evaluation as an approach was shown to offer broad utility and support effect decision making. In some cases, implementation continued according as anticipated however in some instances, data served to support a change in direction. The value of real-time evaluation was the ability to course correct in some instances or identify different value propositions altogether Also integrated was the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Triple Aim focusing evaluation efforts on the extent to which healthcare innovations result in 1) improved population health, 2) enhanced patient experience and 3) reduced healthcare costs -- thereby informing a sustainability model on a provincial scale.


      Finding/Results:
      Of the three pilot projects, one of the solutions was able to move to a full scale provincial rollout. Today, all Ontarians are able to access the Big White Wall - an online peersupport solution for people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety. The panel will share key outcomes from the evaluation, as well as what conclusions were drawn to inform moving from a pilot to a province-wide solution (and why some did not). There are many factors involved that are based on the findings from the initial implementation and the readiness of the healthcare sector.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The evaluation underscored that the following factors contribute to the ability to scale to a provincial solution: • A patient-centred approach to implementation focused on building and maintaining engagement is important. Many types of patient personas can benefit from technology, at all stages of their chronic disease. Provincial rollout needs to consider each persona. • Digital Self-Care technology can be used to help patients better manage their chronic disease – if integrated with clinical care, but sometimes without clinician intervention. Provincial rollout is significantly impacted by the level and types of clinical intervention required. • RCT evaluations have their place, but rapid and rigorous evaluations of technology implementations are necessary not only to assess efficacy of technology, but also to know how best to optimize its utilization in practice and potential funding models. Provincial strategies need to consider payment aligned with rates of usage.


      140 Character Summary:
      Province-wide digital self-care can be achieved with pragmatic evaluation, an understanding of patient personas & aligned health system priorities.

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      PS02.03 - Enabling Digital Health Transformation Through SPARK

      15:45 - 16:45  |  Author(s): Shiran Isaacksz

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Ontarians expect that the wealth of their health information held by the province will be made available to them in the near term through the digital solution they choose. To best enable patient choice, application innovators need a clear and replicable process for connection. The current pathway to connect consumer applications to provincial digital health assets (PDHA) (e.g. labs and prescription information) lacks transparency, clarity and a defined connection process. The SPARK initiative, funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (ministry), aims to make it easier for innovators to safely and securely flow provincial health information into the hands of patients and their health service providers. By March 2019, SPARK will make it possible for approximately 60,000 patients to digitally access their lab and prescription information stored in the PDHAs, through applications like myUHN, MedChart, and Medly. This panel will provide the opportunity for candid insights to be shared from the perspectives of the program team, innovators and patients to discuss the challenges of connecting a consumer health application to provincial digital health repositories and review what changes have been implemented to date.


      Methodology/Approach:
      The SPARK program worked with the ministry and eHealth Ontario to create an efficient, repeatable and sustainable connection process by: - Identifying policy and regulatory challenges, along with areas for potential improvement through a series of 6 workshops with our partners, 8 feedback sessions with 10 innovator groups and lessons learned from connection-related activities to create, for the first time, a comprehensive end-to-end view of the entire process. - Documenting and optimizing a transparent, clear and defined pathway innovators can follow to connect applications to PDHAs and flow health information into the hands of patients - Partnering with hospitals and pilot applications to work through the process of connection, identify areas for improvements and create efficiencies where possible


      Finding/Results:
      This panel will highlight the lessons learned, helpful tips and tools gained from the program’s pathway optimization activities by: - Developing consumer-access policies and drafting a new streamlined assessment process that is in compliance with privacy requirements, and also shortening the assessment process from 2.5 years to approximately 4 months - Drafting one set of harmonized requirements across all stakeholder groups that meets provincial security standards - Creating an Innovator’s Guide that outlines requirements for connecting a consumer application to PDHAs By enabling Phase 2 innovators to connect their applications to PDHAs in a timely manner, SPARK will make it possible for patients to digitally access their medical records.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Bringing together key stakeholders across the digital health technology ecosystem, SPARK will connect patients and their providers with their health data, creating a true collaborative partnership in care delivery and management. Participants at this session will learn about the unique approach taken by the project and insights regarding early benefits and lessons learned from the initial implementation efforts, successes, and challenges. In addition to providing an overview of SPARK, this panel will share early insights on how the patient experience is changing.


      140 Character Summary:
      SPARK enables patient access to digital health information by creating an efficient, repeatable and sustainable connection pathway for consumer health apps.

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    OS09 - Internet of Things Enhances Care

    • 17:00 - 18:00
    • 5/27/2019
    • Location: Area 2
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS09.01 - Socially Assistive Robots for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Sabrina Tang

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Socially assistive robotics run by machine learning algorithms are becoming exponentially powerful. This presentation explores the use of socially assistive robots for children with autism spectrum disorder and the implications of this innovation for patients, families and care providers.


      Methodology/Approach:
      520,000 individuals in Canada are estimated to have autism spectrum disorder. The waitlists for therapy are long and getting longer. in Ontario, for example, the waitlist doubled from March 2013 to 2015. As well, the cost of therapy is steep - $75K per child per year. In 2017, the Senate of Canada called on the federal government to determine the appropriate level of funding for autism spectrum disorder due to the excessive financial burden on families. Applied Behavioural Analysis therapy is the standard of practice for autism spectrum disorder to help children with communication and social skills live more productive lives. In Canada, the use of socially assistive robots Nao (by SoftBank Robotics) and Milo (by Robots4Autism) is currently being evaluated. The anticipated benefits are lower costs, higher clinical outcomes, and reduced burden of care over children's lifespan. Pilot studies show increased social behaviours, reduced repetitive behaviours, and increased spontaneous language. In addition to a review of these potential benefits, this presentation will review potential harms, possible mitigation strategies, and remaining challenges from the perspectives of patients, caregivers, providers, and provincial governments.


      Finding/Results:
      Machine learning algorithms and socially assistive robotics are improving exponentially and there is enormous potential to benefit children with autism spectrum disorder. However, concerns remain regarding trust, relationships, employment, and regulation.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Socially assistive robots are a promising intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder. The government-funded health care system should fund socially assistive robots when they become evidence-based practice.


      140 Character Summary:
      Socially assistive robots can potentially improve therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder

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      OS09.03 - The Virtualists: Introducing the Next Generation of Primary Care Physicians

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Francis Nwakire

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      The purpose of this presentation is to share an overall picture of the virtual care landscape:, from history to present state, and to explore the ‘sickcare-healthcare’ dichotomy. We’ll show how virtual care technologies can help us evolve ‘sickcare’ silos into a more robust, preventative form of healthcare, and how the role of today’s primary care physician will evolve into that of the ‘virtualist’.


      Methodology/Approach:
      By outlining the roots of virtual care and some of its current iterations, we hope to provide a foundation for audiences to understand how this critical and innovative technology will change our notion of the word ‘health’ and the role that community care providers play in our healthcare system.


      Finding/Results:
      During this presentation, Think Research will discuss the ways in which virtual care technology is shifting: - The role of provider vs. patient (patient-directed care) - Changing care models: from reactive and prescriptive to self-directed and preventative - Future directions: how AI and machine learning technologies will change virtual care


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Today’s care providers of all sectors in the continuum need to embrace virtual care technology as it will become woven into the fabric of healthcare systems around the world. By understanding how virtual care is (and will continue to) transform healthcare, clinicians, government bodies and patients alike can prepare for this new, exhilarating age.


      140 Character Summary:
      This presentation will outline the virtual care landscape, showing how virtual care technologies is evolving healthcare systems around the world.

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      OS09.04 - Mobile Health for Personalized Behavior Modification by Personalized Action Planning

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Raza Abidi

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Chronic illness is affecting a large number of Canadians, with ca. 16% of the population having a multi-morbidity as shown by a recent report from the Canadian Chronic Disease Indicators framework (2017)1. Behavior plays a significant role, with behaviors such as physical inactivity, unhealthy diet and smoking often causing or exacerbating chronic illnesses. To realize long-term positive health behavior change, we present a personalized behavior modification framework called Engage, which computerizes key constructs from the evidence-based Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). 1https://infobase.phac-aspc.gc.ca/ccdi-imcc/


      Methodology/Approach:
      We present a knowledge-based, action-planning and community-driven approach to maximize key SCT indicators such as knowledge and self-efficacy, guided by a knowledge model computerizing SCT constructs. Our approach formulates behavior modification programs as sequences of short-term action plans, which are personalized to the patient and designed to overcome perceived barriers to long-term behavior change (mastery experience). The knowledge indicator constitutes knowledge on the risks and benefits of (un)healthy behaviors, and is influenced by frequent educational messages tailored to a patient’s current situation, personal barriers and behavioral goals. To maximize the self-efficacy indicator, which measures one’s perceived ability to perform a long-term goal, multiple SCT constructs are leveraged, such as mastery experience, social modeling and social persuasion. By performing similarity analysis and data mining on detailed patient profiles and patient feedback, our approach leverages the experiences of similar patients in the community (e.g., regarding health, social status and physical characteristics) to (1) suggest action plans with a strong likelihood of success; (2) offer motivation to patients by seeing similar patients succeed (social modeling); and (3) encourage them to connect, exchange advice and provide encouragement on barriers to be overcome (social persuasio


      Finding/Results:
      The Engage framework implements a holistic approach to behavior modification, including (a) collecting an up-to-date patient profile and assessing patient-specific SCT indicators; (b) selecting and tailoring a behavior modification program, based on individual patient profiles and collective patient experiences; (c) delivering timely educational and motivational messages; and (d) monitoring patient compliance and aggregating community-wide feedback on behavior modification programs. The framework includes a number of key components: 1) A core back-end service, which keeps the knowledge model, patient profiles and algorithms for similarity analysis and data mining. 2) A front-end web portal, allowing patients to enter their personal profile, fill out questionnaires for weekly monitoring, and selecting between different action plans to perform. 3) A tailored social network that facilitates patients to connect with other similar patients, post their progress, receive encouragement and see others, similar to their individual situation, succeed. 4) A mobile app (Android, iOS) used by patients to submit progress towards their weekly action plan, receive tailored educational and motivational messages, and serving as a portal into the social network.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The Engage framework currently includes behavior change content for the long-term goal of increasing physical activity – although other content can be easily plugged in – and is undergoing usability tests. We are planning an extensive clinical evaluation of the system, including patients with high risk factors for chronic illness and those suffering from chronic illness.


      140 Character Summary:
      To realize long-term health behavior change, we present a knowledge-based, action-planning and community-driven system guided by the Social Cognitive Theory.

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    OS10 - Four Implementation Vignettes

    • 17:00 - 18:00
    • 5/27/2019
    • Location: Area 3
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS10.01 - e-Mental Health Demonstration Project: Implementing and evaluating Stepped Care 2.0©

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Danielle Impey

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      In 2017, the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) launched an e-mental health (e-MH) demonstration project to improve access to mental health services in publicly funded health systems. The MHCC, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, and the core team at Memorial University of Newfoundland lead by Dr. Peter Cornish, are working closely together to implement and evaluate Stepped Care and e-mental health programming in 15 clinical sites across Newfoundland and Labrador. Stepped Care 2.0© is an evidence-based, rapid access system of delivering programs, including same day, flexible access to mental health resources, including face-to-face and e-MH components, while promoting client autonomy & resilience. Patients receive the least intensive treatment with the greatest likelihood of improvement. Care is stepped up or down depending on client need/preference and is continuously monitored. e-Mental Health refers to the use of the internet and other electronic communication technologies to deliver mental health information & care, and these services have been found to be an effective and complementary option. This rapid access approach aims to reduce wait times and to improve access. The objectives of the project are to: 1. Introduce innovative approaches and new technologies to mental health and addictions service delivery in the province (i.e. stepped care and e-mental health programming). 2. Reduce wait times for services. 3. Improve mental health outcomes.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Data for the evaluation component is collected from healthcare providers and site managers through training workshop and feedback surveys, usage data from pilot sites, outcome scales and interviews. Data is collected from clients via anonymous patient surveys developed by the evaluation team. A report will be produced amalgamating the feedback received during a quality improvement workshop on the project.


      Finding/Results:
      Preliminary results have shown a decrease or elimination of wait lists at some implementation sites. Feedback on the change management and training process by health care providers has been positive. We expect to show improved mental health outcomes through the introduction of stepped care and the e-mental health services offered. The final report will be released in spring 2019.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The rapid access approach of the e-mental health demonstration project aims to reduce wait times and to improve access. Results from the project evaluation will inform opportunities to improve and scale-up Stepped Care 2.0© and similar mental health care approaches.


      140 Character Summary:
      The MHCC's e-mental health demonstration project seeks to improve access by implementing and evaluating Stepped Care and e-mental health rapid access approaches.

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      OS10.02 - Improving Care Transitions from Hospital to Home with Electronic Tool

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Terence Tang

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Care transitions from hospital to home are vulnerable times for patients and caregivers as they sometimes cope with changing physical, cognitive, and functional status, assume increasing self-care responsibilities, and experience change in care plans. As a result, adverse events and unplanned Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital re-admissions sometimes occur. Effective communication (both among the interprofessional team, and with patients/caregivers) is essential to ensure adequate discharge planning and support safe transitions. Our objective is to evaluate the impacts of an electronic communication tool used by clinicians and patients/caregivers on patient experience, ED visits/re-admissions, and care transitions.


      Methodology/Approach:
      We augment a previously built electronic interprofessional communication and collaboration platform used by hospital clinicians to coordinate care of complex hospitalized patients with new discharge planning and patient-facing components. We facilitate care transitions by adapting the Patient-Oriented Discharge Summary (PODS, developed at University Health Network Open Lab) into the discharge planning component, incorporating its electronic completion in clinical workflow via co-design with hospital clinicians, and making PODS electronically available to patients/caregivers after discharge. To evaluate the impact, we are conducting a mixed methods study on 4 general medicine wards. The quantitative component uses an intervention-control design where the intervention will be deployed on 2 wards (intervention arm) with the remaining 2 wards providing usual care (control arm). Outcomes will be measured on both intervention and control wards at 2 time points (baseline and 3 months after the intervention has been deployed in the intervention wards). The qualitative component consists of semi-structured interviews with clinicians and patients/caregivers exposed to the electronic tool to understand the perceived impacts, reasons for success and failure, and contextual factors affecting implementation.


      Finding/Results:
      Quantitative outcome measures include patient experience using 4 selected questions about communication from the Canadian Patient Experience Survey – Inpatient Care (CPES-IC) and 1 question related to overall hospital experience, and care transition using the 3-item Care Transitions Measure (CTM-3). These outcomes will be obtained with post-discharge telephone surveys of patients. Outcome data of ED visit and re-admission within 30 days will be obtained using routinely collected administrative data. A chart review will be used to determine process measures relating to the completion of discharge documentation including PODS. A pre-defined subgroup analysis will be performed for patients with dementia to understand the effect on this complex high-need population. Semi-structured interviews with clinicians and patients/caregivers will explore the experiences more deeply and contextualize quantitative findings. We have so far completed baseline data collection and anticipate that preliminary analysis of full results will be available for the eHealth conference.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      As communication technology continues to advance and its adoption are increasing in the general population, the result of this study will inform if and how such technology may be leveraged to engage patients/caregivers to impact patient experience, care transitions, and outcomes.


      140 Character Summary:
      A mixed methods study assessing the impact of an electronic tool used by clinicians and patients/caregivers on patient experience, care transitions, and outcomes.

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      OS10.03 - Streamlining Electronic Emergency Department Order Sets Between CHEO and SickKids

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Daniel Rosenfield

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Tertiary paediatric care is delivered in only a few large centers in Ontario, and these centers often share patients. It is imperative that they maintain the most up to date and share similar standards when treating children, especially as they act as regional centers of excellence that often determine local practice patterns. One way to standardize care is to align order sets for commonly seen paediatric conditions. Order sets represent evidence-based treatment algorithms to promote standardization of practice amongst frontline providers. We describe the process used at Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa and the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto capitalizing on a shared instance of our Electronic Health Record (EHR) to align Emergency Department (ED) order sets during implementation. This alignment has helped standardize care in the two largest paediatric EDs in the province. Additionally, through future expansion of the Kids Health Alliance (KHA), best implementation practices were shared between CHEO and SickKids for respective EHR rollouts.


      Methodology/Approach:
      As part of the larger KHA initiative, CHEO and SickKids are sharing one instance of Epic, the enterprise-wide EHR. As a result, there is a joint KHA Governance; however, each department is still responsible for building/maintaining its own content/order sets. Local ED subject matter experts (SMEs) reached out to one another to compare order sets, using the Epic go-live as a catalyst for collaboration. Order sets were compared in an iterative fashion, presented to local committees and integrated and modified accordingly to local preferences. The net result was an overall alignment of various order sets, as well as expansion of order sets at both institutions. This initial collaboration led to further understanding between institutions, resulting in further utility at go-live, when individuals from CHEO came to the SickKids ED to help local users navigate the system on go-live weekend.


      Finding/Results:
      Prior to collaboration, SickKids had 18 unique ED order set documents while CHEO had 37. Following review and internal consolidation of existing order sets, SickKids finalized 25 EHR-version ED order sets, including 8 order sets derived from CHEO original order sets. Similarly, CHEO developed 28 unique order sets and derived one of these from a SickKids order set. Many order sets were similar between institutions with only minor amendments introduced due to the collaboration.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      As large-scale EHRs and hospital alliances become more commonplace, collaboration between local divisions/department allow providers to implement local best practices and standardize care across multiple institutions. This can be achieved via the standardization of order sets, and further collaboration can be facilitated by having ‘boots on the ground’ from individuals from each institution help out at others during EMR implementation.


      140 Character Summary:
      Through the Kids Health Alliance and one shared EMR, several disparate ED order sets were aggregated and shared across CHEO and SickKids to promote best practices

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      OS10.04 - An Implementation Story: Public Health Digitization in Nova Scotia

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Latifa Mnyusiwalla

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Public health digitization is a silent stream in the eHealth landscape where acute care and primary care implementations dominate the conversation. Immunization registries and communicable disease management systems are key to modernizing public health practice, reporting and surveillance, and protecting and enabling a healthy population. This presentation aims to shed some light on public health system implementations in Canada, through telling the story of Nova Scotia’s journey in becoming one of the only provinces in Canada, and globally, to have a single, seamless system for the management of immunization, vaccine inventory, and communicable disease data.


      Methodology/Approach:
      In January 2017, Nova Scotia embarked on an ambitious project to configure and deploy the Inventory, Immunization and Communicable Disease/Outbreak modules of a comprehensive public health information system over a 23-month period. Each module is a distinct business area with different requirements, configuration, integration points, and users. A consulting firm partnered with the vendor of the system to serve as the implementation team. The large multi-disciplinary team to ensure that subject matter expertise for all components of the deployment was available. This included a team of business analysts, a public health subject matter expert, configuration experts, data migration and integration experts, report developers, a testing team, a change management lead, and a senior project manager. At time of abstract submission, the Inventory and Immunizations modules have been deployed, with the Communicable Disease module to follow at the end of 2018.


      Finding/Results:
      Some lessons learned that may be beneficial to other provinces/jurisdictions embarking on public health digitization projects: - Leveraging existing configuration from other provinces was not as beneficial initially thought. Though the goals of public health bodies across Canada are universal (e.g. health promotion, disease prevention etc.), how programs and services are delivered differs from province to province. - The intensity of the project scope, scale and timelines warranted a large multi-disciplinary project team to ensure that subject matter expertise for all components of the deployment was available. The cohesiveness and effective communication within the team, and between the team and the client was integral to successful deployments. - Engaging end users early in the implementation through the establishment of Working Groups that met weekly throughout the duration of the deployment, fostered ownership of the project and the configuration. Working Groups were key to driving decisions about business processes and configuration. Decision-fatigue, time-pressures to make decisions, and not being able to fully understand the implications of a decision surfaced as issues with this approach.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Public health system implementation projects historically in Canada have been long and complex. Other jurisdictions have rolled out much less functionality over a longer period of time, so the Nova Scotia implementation was determined to be very aggressive with many potential points of failure. To date, this project is the fastest deployment of a provincial public health system in Canada. The project is on track within the original schedule. The project team and the province have risen to the challenge of delivering and experiencing three go-lives within an 18-month period.


      140 Character Summary:
      Nova Scotia’s journey in implementing a seamless information system for the management of immunization, vaccine inventory, and communicable disease data.

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    OS11 - The Value of Moving to Digital...Realizing the Benefits

    • 17:00 - 18:00
    • 5/27/2019
    • Location: Area 4
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS11.01 - Digitally Advancing Ontario's Shift to Deliver an Integrated Care Experience

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Katie Fong

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      In Ontario, significant progress has been made to develop foundation digital assets; however, one of the biggest challenges – and opportunities – is in how advancements in technology can be used to improve the care experience for both citizens and care providers. Recognizing this need, the Connected Care team at UHN, Canada’s largest healthcare and research institution, built on its efforts to breakdown silos in data and care delivery, by leveraging digital technologies to provide a seamless care experience. Drawing on their efforts to approach integrated care delivery from a regional perspective, representing 1.2 million Ontarians in the TC LHIN, the team focused their work on surgical procedures as well as the senior/frail elderly population. This presentation focuses on sharing the insights and lessons learned from their experience on the role that digital technologies can play in advancing integrated care delivery in Ontario.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Before diving into any digital technologies, it was important to first understand the fundamental success factors to deliver integrated care. This included co-designing with patients and care providers, empowering and engaging the stakeholders, using simple and available technologies, supporting the development of operational backbone structures to create capacity within organizations, and leveraging bundled payment models. From this, the team embarked to define digital technologies to support frail elderly and surgical patients. A quantitative and qualitative current state assessment of patient transitions in these care settings was completed. Patients and providers were then engaged to map the patient journey and identify gaps preventing seamless transitions in the clinical and information workflow. Thereafter, a critical analysis of existing digital tools was conducted to understand which tools were valuable for seamless transitions.


      Finding/Results:
      Upon project completion, UHN Connected Care was able to gain valuable insights into the relevant and practical tools that meet patient and provider needs. The team not only identified digital tools that drive the integrated care experience for the in-scope pathways explored within the project, but also a framework by which to identify digital tools to drive the integrated care experience for other pathways. Lesson learned include how projects can ensure that digital tools will be used and actually improve the care experience, as well as the criteria projects should consider in identifying what digital enablers are needed and feasible for an integrated care experience. UHN Connected Care continues to work in collaboration with many stakeholders across the care continuum to enable a broader vision for integrated care in Ontario. This work helps to set a foundation that is aligned with critical enablers identified from initiatives in Ontario, Canada and around the world.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      This experience has enabled a shift in how digital health tools are leveraged, and how clinicians collaborate to improve patient care across the continuum. By investing in digital technologies, patients should have confidence that they have the right supports in place, and that all members of their circle of care have the data needed to make informed decisions. Furthermore, it is the hope that digital technologies can drive the platform to accelerate integration of care.


      140 Character Summary:
      UHN Connected Care shares insights and lessons learned on the role that digital technologies can play in advancing integrated care delivery in Ontario.

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      OS11.02 - Primary Care: Analytical Value of Standardized and Linked EMR Data

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Michael Hunt

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Standardizing Electronic Medical Record (EMR) primary care data for clinical and secondary analysis is a challenge across Canada. This session explores how EMR content standards and a systematic approach to structuring EMR data can improve the quality and usability of community-based primary care information. The session will also present evidence on the value of linking structured primary care EMR data to hospital administrative data to analyse the client journey across the continuum of care.


      Methodology/Approach:
      This initiative is a partnership between a pan-Canadian organization and a group of community-based primary care organizations in Ontario. In July 2018, linkable primary care EMR data from 570,000 clients across the primary care organizations was extracted from a data mart which houses the set of high-quality data. The 73 organizations use a common and innovative approach to standardizing data. As a first phase, the EMR data quality and structure was assessed according to the pan-Canadian partner’s Data Source Assessment Tool and Primary Care EMR Content Standard. Once deemed fit for use, the EMR data was linked to hospital data including emergency department (ED) visits and acute care in-patient stays. A proof of concept analysis was conducted on a cohort of primary care clients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), with a focus on their socio-demographic and prevalence characteristics, how they were managed in primary care and their journey through the continuum of care.


      Finding/Results:
      Key findings include: • Minimal data processing was required to make quality EMR data fit for analysis • Of enrolled clients, 76% had a valid health care number to enable linkage • Diagnosis and related data are highly codified and complete • The data are in good alignment with the pan-Canadian EMR content standard • For the proof of concept analysis, COPD clients most commonly had between 10-19 primary care (PC) visits per year with multi-disciplinary care. Common reasons for PC visits included health advice/ instructions, medication renewal and discussion regarding the treatment plan. • In exploring the client journey through the continuum, COPD clients had an average of 5 ED visits and 2 acute care stays over the 3 year study period, which is representative of a disease that has a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life. • Results for prevalence rates and ED/ acute care utilization were comparable to recent Canadian studies. • Rich information about health concerns, interventions, risk factors, social determinants of health, vaccinations, referrals and non-physician providers were highly valuable to explore the characteristics of clients and their management in primary care. • Key challenges included the absence of EMR data about medications, lab results and risk factors in the data mart, as well as low completeness rates of certain data elements due to recent implementation


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Standardized EMR data that is also linkable provides opportunities to explore the client journey through the care continuum, in an innovative way beyond what other data sources can provide. Lessons from this partnership can inform future progress in EMR data standardization efforts in primary care models across Canada.


      140 Character Summary:
      Partnership shows value of standardized primary care data linked to hospital data, to understand the client journey across the care continuum

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      OS11.03 - Providers and Patients Together: How Apps Enhance Relationships and Outcomes

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Alexandra Best

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      The healthcare system faces strain as the number of Canadians living with chronic disease grows, placing unsustainable demands on healthcare delivery and budgets. Fortunately, new paradigms involving digital health solutions are showing promising results – in terms of increasing patient engagement and demonstrable impact on outcomes. We will explore how two digital health solutions – for youth mental health and prostate cancer – have impacted patient and clinician experience. imTEEN: The winner of several patient engagement awards, imTEEN is a complete clinical management approach to youth mental health. A Personal Health Record (PHR) integrated with patient and clinician web portals and a phone app, imTEEN complements existing care delivery pathways by letting youth and their caregivers regularly communicate and share information. Ned: Named for “No Evident Disease,” Ned is a novel prostate cancer survivorship application, uniquely linking providers and patients. Ned gives patients and their oncologists a means to prospectively collect patient-recorded outcomes. Data can be used to prompt behavioral or treatment changes or to inform trends in health outcomes. Ned is designed for patients at all therapeutic stages of prostate cancer survivorship, and gives patients the tools to view personal outcomes over time.


      Methodology/Approach:
      During this moderated dialog, panelists will have the opportunity to: 1. Explain the unique needs of their respective patient cohorts 2. Describe how their solution meets these unique needs 3. Share evaluation research 4. Reflect on the efficacy of patient engagement tools in health


      Finding/Results:
      imTEEN: Phases 1 and 2 pilots for imTEEN have been completed, and evaluation research has been gathered. Evaluation shows: Youth: preferred the imTEEN phone app to other, more adult-friendly mobile solutions felt more connected to care were better able to understand mood cycles, recognize triggers, control symptoms, and reduce need for interventions. felt imTEEN saved time, a result of fewer and more productive care provider visits Care providers: were impressed with the immediacy of imTEEN’s bi-directional communication and real-time data were pleased that the solution fit into existing workflows / did not disrupt their current practice Ned: The Ned program was launched at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in November 2017 with two clinicians and their patient rosters. Patients are prescribed Ned to receive PSA test results and complete monthly surveys. To date, 230 patients ranging in age from 59 to 77 have been enrolled in the Ned program, and over half of them have activated a Ned account. Of those 120 patients, 49% have undergone radiation therapy, 44% surgery, and 32% hormone therapy. 148 patients (64.3%) have completed a baseline EPIC-26 survey, and reported a significant decrease in quality of life since treatment began. Preliminary results suggest that implementing the Ned program into routine clinical practice is feasible, and that survivors are adopting Ned for prostate cancer survivorship care. Insights on how the application might best support clinical interactions and decision making will be available for presentation in May.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Promising early results show that digital health apps can lead to more meaningful patient / provider interactions and improved shared decision-making.


      140 Character Summary:
      Mobile health solutions enhance patient and care provider communication leading to more meaningful interactions and improved shared decision-making.

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      OS11.04 - Evaluation of an EMR-Integrated Innovation for Best-Practice Care

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Jonathan Thomas

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      1. Learn about an innovative EMR-integrated technology solution's evaluation for enhancing delivery of patient-centred best practice care for up to 14 concurrent vascular chronic diseases and risk factors while reducing redundancies and increasing efficiencies in e-documentation. 2. Explore the usability of the solution that will expand the health care team’s capacity and help providers within the team work to their full scope of practice. 3. Augment your understanding of barriers and strategies for spreading health technology innovations beyond one clinical practice. Caring for patients who are often complex with multiple concurrent vascular diseases and risk factors presents many challenges. Multiple changing clinical practice guidelines that are not well-integrated into EMRs or workflows further compound the challenge. One innovative solution has been developed to meet these challenges. It is a secure, cloud-based, EMR-integrated evidence-based guidelines-aligned patient-care tool that supports the care of patients who have any combination of one or more of 14 common vascular conditions or risk factors. It is built on a scalable, standards-based architecture that permits future inclusion of additional chronic conditions. The Peninsula Family Health Team (FHT) partnered with the Software Developer and with eHealth Centre for Excellence, Centre for Effective Practice, CorHealth Ontario, Women’s College Hospital Institute for Health System Solutions and Virtual Care, and the Stroke Network of Southeastern Ontario to pursue an evaluation of the solution in an 18-month project.


      Methodology/Approach:
      A collaborative implementation plan included: · A protocol and data analysis plan to measure the implementation and impact of the solution; · Recruitment of 50+ health care providers across Ontario; · Engagement of additional EMR vendors; · A privacy impact analysis; A sustainability plan including reporting, monitoring, linking of quality improvement support, and guideline knowledge translation. The mixed methods evaluation, following the RE-AIM framework, examines the implementation of the solution in primary care clinics and its effectiveness for enhancing management of vascular patients. The analysis will inform widespread adoption and sustainability.


      Finding/Results:
      Early clinical validation was performed by Peninsula FHT, which has the solution fully integrated into their OSCAR EMR. Users said the tool: “helped solve a clinically hard problem” and “added more support for allied health to assess and manage patients.” The primary care physician lead at the FHT noted, “improved workflow efficiencies with potential to increase roster size through the enablement of more health care professionals working to their full scope of practice with redistribution of the work to the most appropriate care provider.” The project team is piloting the use of this innovative health technology solution and aiming to support early adopter evaluation among primary care providers across Ontario.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The project team is implementing and evaluating the impact of the solution in real life practices. A number of measures are being observed, including wait times to see providers and proportions of eligible patients who have self-management plans in place. The analysis will inform widespread adoption and sustainability.


      140 Character Summary:
      Findings will augment understanding of processes for clinically meaningful e-health technologies in clinical settings and impact on workflow & patient outcomes.

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    PS03 - Models of Home Care Using Technology

    • 17:00 - 18:00
    • 5/27/2019
    • Location: Area 1
    • Type: Panel Session
    • Track:
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      PS03.01 - Healthy at Home – Sharing Stories

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Heather Harps

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Over 2200 patients have participated in the BC Home Health Monitoring (HHM) program, a service free to BC residents that lets clients learn more about and manage their health and chronic condition from home. The program has saved over $4.8M in acute care costs alone, while saving the entire health system about $15.9M. While these results are truly impressive, in this panel we welcome a patient, a family care giver, a clinician and a program sponsor to share the qualitative impact of home health monitoring (outside of the system-level benefits that are typically the focus of such presentations). Participants will share the multi-faceted impact of HHM on care experience: more peace of mind and education, with less stress and anxiety.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Following the HHM program, clients and clinicians completed surveys that helped measure and improve impact. In addition to health system benefits such as reduced emergency visits and fewer hospitalizations, patients and clinicians reported high levels of satisfaction. HHM clinicians rated overall satisfaction with the HHM service, likelihood to recommend HHM to a colleague, and HHM’s impact on care delivery. Patients were asked about their overall satisfaction with the HHM service, progress towards health goals, and impact on quality of life, on self-management, and on family/caregiver confidence that the patient is receiving the care they need.


      Finding/Results:
      In 5 recent studies: -Client satisfaction with HHM ranged from 92% to 99%[1] -Client self-care activation increased 34% [2] -Overall quality of life increased 101% [3] In this panel presentation, we will hear directly from patients, family and/or caregivers, and clinicians as they discuss self-care, self-management and quality of life, with stories such as: - "Dealing with a heart issue was new to us, and having the equipment was a security blanket. It gave me the confidence that we were doing the right things and that my husband is ok. My husband is back to feeling as good as he did before the event.” - “The monitoring system makes you feel supported and like you have a team behind you. You don’t feel abandoned. They help you with your condition and monitor you on a daily basis.” - "I had some health concerns this morning, and before I knew it my nurse was calling me and talked me through it. I feel much better already." - "I sure like this equipment. By seeing the readings I am able to tell how I'm doing each day and feel confident in managing my health." [1] Island Health HHM - Heart Failure & COPD 2015 – 2017, Interior Health HHM – Heart Failure - 2017 [2] Island Health & Interior Health HHM Heart Failure Limited Production Rollout 2013 – 2015 [3] TEC4HOME Heart Failure, UBC feasibility study, Phase 1 - 2017


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Ongoing feedback from patients, family members and clinicians is a critical input in designing sustainable solutions to improve the lives of patients with chronic diseases and co-morbidities such as high blood pressure and anxiety. HHM programs are having a positive impact on patients’ quality of life.


      140 Character Summary:
      Qualitative patient, family and clinician feedback on a program’s potential to reduce anxiety from chronic disease is critical input for successful design.

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      PS03.02 - Connecting Care to Home - New Model of Care

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Nasser Khalil

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      London Health Sciences, South West LHIN, and Sensory Technologies have partnered to develop an innovative service delivery model to support chronic patient populations admitted with CHF and COPD. The model was developed in 2015 to reduce the ALC burden hospital and LHIN’s alike face today. Most importantly the program is designed to bridge the information gap that occurs between patients, families, caregivers, and physicians when patients are discharged from the hospital.


      Methodology/Approach:
      LHSC utilizes and integrated care team across Hospital, primary care and home care. Following hospital discharge, an eShift enabled home care intervention transitions into the community to execute the collaborative care plan developed by the integrated team. Prior to discharge, the in-patient team coordinates with the bridging team which consists of the COPD/CHF navigator, clinical care coordinator (RN) and specialist. The in-home team utilizes the directed care technology of eshift to execute the care plan through a directing RN, care technician, Physiotherapist, Occupational Therapist, Respiratory Therapist under the oversight of the primary care physician. Patients have access to a nurse through a 24/7 line reducing the need to return to hospital. Patients receive clinical support and monitoring as well as education to accelerate their transition to independence.


      Finding/Results:
      The Connected Care to Home Program (CC2H) helped deliver a superior level of care to patients across the SW region suffering from COPD/CHF diseases and has also greatly benefited both the LHIN and the Hospitals involved. We have seen significant reductions in hospital length of stay, 30- and 60-day readmission rates, ED visits and overall cost of treatment. There has also been a significant increase in patient and caregiver satisfaction picture1.png


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      One of the key successes of the CC2H program was the ability to close informational gaps between patients, families, caregivers, and primary care physicians post-discharge from hospital. Real-time updates enabled clinicians to track patient progress, make recommendations to changes care as they progressed through recovery, and provide a point of contact for the community of care to reach out to in the event of an unexpected event. We continue to see interest in surrounding LHIN’s and hospitals due to the ever increase ALC crisis that looms over Ontario. We believe that with the right tools this issue can be managing with minimal organizational changes while utilizing existing infrastructure and resources available.


      140 Character Summary:
      The CC2H model has demonstrated an effective solution to safely discharge COPD and CHF patients from ALC beds earlier and accelerate treatment in the community.

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      PS03.03 - Delivering Healthcare Innovation on Remote and Indigenous Communities

      17:00 - 18:00  |  Author(s): Tania Massa

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Ontario has a population that is aging and expanding. Within this context, seniors (65 years and older) and Indigenous populations are two distinct demographics that face barriers to accessing care. Seniors are the fastest growing age group in Ontario. By 2041, it is projected that 25 per cent of Ontario’s populations will be 65 years or older, a 50 per cent increase to 4.6 million seniors from 3 million seniors in 2016. This places significant pressure on the province’s healthcare system. More than 22 per cent of all Canada’s Indigenous population lives in Ontario. Almost half the Indigenous population in Ontario live on reserves and settlements. A majority of these settlements are small, remote communities, accessible only by air or, in winter, by air or ice road. Supporting these demographics poses challenges within the health system. (e.g. How to increase efficiencies with home health while maintaining quality of life?). One proven way of delivering better patient outcomes as well as better value for limited healthcare dollars is to treat patients in their communities or in their homes, where they are most comfortable and don’t incur the costs of time, money and stress involved in travelling long distances to receive care. Through the Health Technologies Fund (HTF), a program of the Government of Ontario’s Office of the Chief Health Innovation Strategist (OCHIS) and administered by Ontario Centres of Excellence, we would like to highlight two projects that deliver innovative healthcare remotely – one for a rural Ontario community and one for a remote Indigenous community.


      Methodology/Approach:
      The first project is tablet-based and allows healthcare providers to keep in touch with patients, including video consultations over the device, appointment reminders and reassurance. The second project aims to provide diabetes clients with an easy-to-use digital health solution for mobile health and tele-monitoring and secure communication among all members of a client’s circle of care. HTF supports the development of made-in-Ontario health technologies by accelerating evaluation, procurement, adoption and diffusion in the Ontario health system projects of up to 24 months in duration. HTF fosters partnerships between publicly-funded health service providers (HSPs), patients, academia and industry to drive collaboration that improves patient outcomes, optimizes the impact of investment in health innovation and scales health innovation companies. HTF projects are evaluated by third-party teams with expertise in technology adoption and diffusion, design and implementation and health economics. The evaluation component of the projects supports the development of a plan to support wider-scale procurement and/or adoption of the technology in Ontario.


      Finding/Results:
      These two projects were deployed in 2017 and are good examples of demonstration projects deployed in remote communities that include both clinician and patient engagement aimed at improving health outcomes, minimizing complications through early interventions, and reducing cost of care delivery for patients with complex chronic illnesses.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Mobile health and telemedicine technologies hold significant potential to provide high-quality basic and advanced monitoring/diagnostics to an aging population with increased incidence of mobility challenges as well as those in remote communities.


      140 Character Summary:
      Innovative projects enable technology demonstrations that can more efficiently and effectively deliver homecare in remote and indigenous communities.

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    OS12 - Smart Consumers

    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS12.01 - Froogie - Healthy Eating Goes Global

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Ashwin Kutty

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is an important target for cancer prevention. Public health goals recommend that we consume at least 600g of fruit and vegetables each day, which is the equivalent of at least five or more servings daily, but many people fail to achieve this target. In Canada, only 1 in 10 children consume the recommended intake of fruits and vegetables. Innovative ways to engage children in increasing fruit and vegetable intake for positive health benefits are therefore needed. One way to do this is through interactive smartphone apps that offer real potential for delivery and evaluation of health interventions in an innovative and engaging way. Given the ubiquity of smart phones among Canadians, apps offer the potential for enhanced accessibility, portability and interactivity to support health behaviours, like increasing fruit and vegetable intake.


      Methodology/Approach:
      As part of a broader research project, we developed a smartphone application designed to promote fruit and vegetable consumption among families with young children. The app, called Froogie (a named derived from the words fruit and veggie), was developed to engage families with young children in recognizing the importance of eating more fruits and vegetables for health. The app featured cartoon characters, called Froogies, and messaging around ways to increase fruit and vegetable intake. We undertook pilot-testing with a sample of families, prior to launch on the app store and google play. The app was designed to be self-contained and included elements of gamification to encourage engagement over a nine-week period.


      Finding/Results:
      Froogie was launched in March 2017, garnering 1000 downloads in its first week after launch, and featured on the Apple App Store as a New and Notable app in its second week. Apple also Recommended the App while also hitting over 2 Million impressions within the first month. Feedback from users highlighted the engaging nature of the app for children, as well as the opportunity to use the app characters to introduce children to different types of fruits and vegetables. Users also highlighted further opportunities for refinement of the app, for example through incorporating rewards for achieving recommendations and additional health messaging. The App garnered the attention of the Daveys and was the winner of a Gold Davey internationally placing it amongst the top 20% of all applications designed & developed for a smart device.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Smartphone apps, designed to be interactive and engaging, offer one way of promoting positive health behaviours among diverse groups. Froogie therefore has great potential as a behavior change intervention. However, more work is needed to field test the app using a theoretically-driven framework and to refine the components to address user feedback.


      140 Character Summary:
      Froogie is a gamified approach to improve healthy eating by shifting the statistic of only 1 in 10 children consuming the recommended fruits and vegetables.

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      OS12.02 - Digital Service for Youth: Learnings from a National Texting Service

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Alisa Simon

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Accessing traditional mental health services can be challenging with stigma, lack of services, long waiting lists and other barriers preventing youth from connecting to needed supports. In addition, youth of all ages, are increasingly looking for e-services to support their mental health and well-being. More data is needed on the efficacy of these e-services and the impacts of implementing new digital health solutions for youth. This session will provide results for a new national texting service for youth, including how AI has been used to improve user experience, evaluation results on the impact of the service and movement towards development of Canada’s largest database on youth mental health challenges. Learning Objectives Understand the efficacy of a fully implemented e-mental health solution for youth Determine the challenges, merits and limitations of implementing e-health services for youth populations Review usage data to understand the audiences digital health solutions are attracting and where more work is needed to serve all Canadians. Discuss how e-mental health services can and need to work together to develop an integrated solution for youth in Canada


      Methodology/Approach:
      Young people across Canada are suffering from challenges to their mental health and wellbeing, including mental illness. And yet, an estimated 75% of children with mental disorders do not access specialized treatment services. And, young people are increasingly relying on emergency departments, which, between 2007-2017, had a 66% increase in visits. This is in large part to long waiting times for counselling and therapy, a confusing and fragmented system, stigma, the lack of local services and transportation and dearth of culturally appropriate services. Digital health solutions, like Kids Help Phone’s services, can play a critical role in providing accessible services to youth who, otherwise would not reach out for mental health support. The objective of this session is to present the Kids Help Phone experience as they launched and scaled Canada’s first 24/7 texting line as well as to share evaluation data around the efficacy of e-mental health solutions for youth.


      Finding/Results:
      Top 4 reasons young people reached out through texting was: Anxiety, Depression, Relationships and Isolation. · 24% - of texters spoke about suicidal thoughts Outcomes · 88% of respondents found their texting conversation helpful · 87% reported feeling less alone, less distressed, less upset, more hopeful, more confident and more-in control of their issue. · 60% said they had not shared their experience or feelings about the issue they were texting about with anyone else before. · 79% percent said had they not texted for help, they would have tried to manage the issue on their own, not spoken to anyone, or ignored the issue, hoping it got better or went away. · 7% said they would have gone to an emergency room. Crisis Text Line powered by Kids Help Phone is there for young people of diverse backgrounds, age-levels, and sexual orientation. · 11% - Indigenous · 9% - visible minority


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Digital e-mental health services for young people work and can provide important access points to needed mental health services.


      140 Character Summary:
      This session will provide results for a new national texting service, including how AI has been used to improve user experience and evaluation results

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      OS12.03 - Outcomes of a Heart Failure Telemonitoring Program after Two Years

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Emily Seto

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      There is growing evidence from clinical trials on the potential of telemonitoring to improve heart failure outcomes, but still very few sustained programs exist as standard of care. A smartphone-based heart failure telemonitoring program, named Medly, was established at the Ted Rogers and Family Centre of Excellence in Heart Function, University Health Network (UHN) in August 2016. The objective of this evaluation was to determine the impact of the Medly Program on patient health outcomes, patient self-care, and healthcare utilization, two years after the initiation of the Program.


      Methodology/Approach:
      This pragmatic pre- and post-test evaluation included questionnaires administered to patients at baseline and 6 months. The questionnaires included the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) to determine the impact of the Program on patient self-care, the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) to determine its impact on quality of life, and questions to determine patient satisfaction. Other outcome measures included blood test values, such as brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) which is a prognostic marker for heart function. Healthcare utilization measures included comparing the number of hospitalizations, length of hospital stay, number of visits to the emergency department, and number of visits to the heart function clinic six months before enrolling into the program and six months during the Program. Data analyses included comparing baseline and 6-month values with paired t-tests for data with normal distributions and Wilcoxon signed rank tests for not normally distributed data.


      Finding/Results:
      Approximately two years after initiation of the Medly Program, there were 232 patients who had been in the Medly Program for at least 6 months (mean age 58+/-16; 79% male). Statistically significant findings included improved self-care maintenance (4.9-point SCHFI maintenance increase; p<0.001), improved quality of life (3.8-point MLHFQ decrease; p=0.04), and improved BNP (from 626 pg/mL to 499 pg/mL; p=0.04). No differences in healthcare utilization measures were found, except an increase in the number of heart function clinic visits (from 1.9 visits to 3.8 visits over the 6-month period; p<0.001). Patients generally rated the Medly Program with high satisfaction, such as 90% of patients strongly agreeing (63%) or agreeing (27%) the Medly Program was important for managing their heart failure.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Over the first two years of the Medly Program, it has been found to improve patients’ self-care management, quality of life, and heart function (i.e., improvement in BNP). The evaluation was underpowered to detect changes in hospitalization and emergency department visits, but an increase in the number of clinic visits was found. However, the cost of additional beneficial scheduled clinic visits may be a positive outcome if it results in improved health outcomes and reductions in hospitalizations. Future evaluations with a larger sample size as the Medly Program continues to expand at UHN and other sites will help determine the impact of the Program on healthcare utilization. Our current evaluation provides preliminary support for the effectiveness of heart failure telemonitoring as standard of care, particularly with the use of a smartphone-based telemonitoring system.


      140 Character Summary:
      A smartphone-based telemonitoring program improved self-care, quality of life, and heart function during its first two years.

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      OS12.04 - Closing the Circle of Care in First Nations Communities

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Karl Mallory

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Over the past year, the Closing the Circle of Care Project has made excellent progress. A partnership between Cowichan Tribes and Canada Health Infoway supports First Nations across Canada to adopt purpose-built digital health tools. 100+ First Nations are working with us to improve digital health capacity and enable patients with access to their health records. We are collaborating with First Nations and their healthcare partners to advance interoperability, clinical workflow coordination and patient access – all with the objective of closing the circle of care for First Nations community members.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Cowichan Tribes is a leader in digital health solutions and understands the challenges of implementing digital health tools in First Nations health centres. Canada Health Infoway has a long, successful record of digital health tools implementation. Combining our knowledge, we have developed a comprehensive implementation methodology that addresses the many challenges on-reserve health centres encounter when they transition from siloed, paper-based health systems towards transformative digital health tools. Our National Expansion Project works with interested First Nations across the country to enhance privacy and security capacity, address technical infrastructure gaps, migrate data, manage change, and support adoption and use of new digital health tools for both health centre providers and community members. This comprehensive approach resonates with the First Nations we’re working with and up to 137 First Nations organizations across Canada are implementing the Mustimuhw community EMR (cEMR) and Mustimuhw Citizen Health Portal (an interoperable Personal Health Record). Many First Nations have gone live and are beginning to benefit from their new digital health foundation. Many are now seeking to leverage the interoperability within their new digital health tools to create more tightly coordinated care models with their healthcare partners while increasing the scope and value of patient-accessible health records in the Citizen Health Portal.


      Finding/Results:
      Since our presentation at this conference last year, the number of First Nations participating in our project has increased significantly. As workflows transition from paper-based to electronic, many opportunities for standardization are being identified and advanced. We are working with funding and support agencies to bring efficiencies to screening activities, reporting functions, transitions of care and other areas of day-to-day operations. We are working with regional groups to explore how the growing use of these tools can support surveillance, epidemiology, program evaluation, health transformation, Nation-based capacity development and First Nations Health Data Sovereignty. But perhaps most importantly, hundreds of health care providers in First Nations health centres are now benefiting from practical digital health tools, and their patients are able to access their own health records, communicate electronically with their care providers and participate meaningfully in their circle of care.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Our results continue to indicate that the implementation of a foundational cEMR and an interoperable PHR solution is a viable, practical and efficient digital health strategy for First Nations. Provincial health care partners should continue their work with First Nations communities, leverage this new digital health capacity and advance opportunities to improve circle of care coordination for First Nation community members.


      140 Character Summary:
      The Mustimuhw cEMR and Citizen Health Portal are advancing capacity and circle of care coordination for First Nations health teams and community members

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    OS13 - My Information, My Access!

    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS13.01 - Implementation and Impacts of a Pediatric Patient Portal Launch

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Ellen Goldbloom

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      A pediatric patient portal was piloted in Fall 2014 and launched November 2016 in attempt to increase patient/family engagement in their care and provide a secure means of communication with the health care team. We aim to continuously evaluate key process indicators (KPI) and end-user feedback both quantitatively and qualitatively.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Evaluation of the pilot guided expansion of portal functionality to include messaging to the health team and patient entered information (e.g., new allergies, medications, questionnaires). Annual evaluation, KPI data and a partnership with a second pediatric hospital enhanced the value-added features for families.


      Finding/Results:
      The portal is available to all patients/families and 2-way messaging is live in 30% of teams (~800 messages exchanged each month) and expanding to all clinics. Number of accounts is increasing steadily with highest uptake in clinics with complex patients populations (e.g., 47% of complex care clinic patients). Portal-user feedback has been positive: • 94% viewed health information • 94% agreed that registration was easy and that the portal was easy to use • 92 % agreed that portal health information was accurate and 93% understood it • 91% agreed that they received test results in a timely way and 91% agreed that they were easy to understand • Of those sending secure messages, 91% felt the response was timely and 94% found it helpful • Due to the portal, 54% avoided a call to a clinic and 31% avoided a clinic visit. • 76% agreed that the portal helped them feel more prepared for next clinic visit We underestimated the profound impact on families who have described the portal as their lifeline. since it relieves their burden of compiling and cataloguing information. Integrating the use of a patient portal also required shifting the culture of how the chart is regarded – moving from a communication tool for the clinical team to a shared resource of information. Youth access needed to be contemplated ensuring that youth consent and control access to their information. Providers’ worry about the increased workload related to questions about information seen in the portal and messages received was not realized. Nurses report streamlined documentation and efficiency with messaging. Providers note that their clinical visits have been reshaped. With less time spent reviewing information, more time can be spent to address important issues and solidify care plans. Errors in the chart noted by families was a worry of providers, but have been found to build trust and ultimately increases EMR accuracy and potentially patient safety.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Patient portals are becoming more common place and require a shift in culture to embrace the benefits. We expected positive patient/family feedback and clinician apprehension. We did not predict the impact that families describe or the change in the exam room. Early adopters sharing their stories can assist with change management. Pediatric patient portals provide an impetus ensure that activation strategies consider the need for appropriate proxy and youth access. Functionality that allows for communication and updates from families facilitates a truly shared communication tool that leads to empowerment.


      140 Character Summary:
      We describe launch and evaluation of a pediatric patient portal with functionality to review and add information as well communicate with the health care team.

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      OS13.02 - e-Health Portal Improves Pregnancy-Related Concerns of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients 

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Reed Sutton

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      The impact of a mother’s chronic disease on fetal development makes dealing with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) during pregnancy complicated. Almost 50% of women with IBD have poor reproductive knowledge; this has been associated with unsubstantiated concerns toward pregnancy, and towards IBD medications. We developed an educational e-health portal for pregnancy in IBD patients. We have previously shown it can improve knowledge acutely and in follow up. We now aim to evaluate its effectiveness for addressing IBD patients’ reproductive and medication concerns.


      Methodology/Approach:
      IBD patients aged 18-45 years accessed an e-health portal covering the topics of heritability, fertility, surgery, pregnancy outcomes, delivery, postpartum, and breastfeeding in the context of IBD and IBD medications. They completed pre-, post-, and 6+ month post-intervention questionnaires covering IBD-specific reproductive concerns, beliefs about medicines (BMQ), medication adherence (MARS), and knowledge (CCPKnow). The non-parametric McNemar’s test was used to determine if the proportion of patients who had each pregnancy concern decreased post-intervention. For medication concerns, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare median differences between Likert scores. 95% confidence intervals and SPSS Version 23 were used for all analysis.


      Finding/Results:
      Seventy-eight of 111 patients (70.3%) completed pre and post-intervention questionnaires. Demographics for the 78 are as follows: median age 29.3 (IQR 25.6 - 32.9) years; 54 (69.2%) Crohn’s disease; 21 (26.9%) ulcerative colitis; 63 (80.3%) females, 5 (7.9%) currently pregnant and 19 (30.2%) previously pregnant. Medication history: 10 (12.8%) sulfasalazine, 67 (85.9%) mesalamine/5-ASAs, 17 (21.8%) budesonide, 63 (80.8%) steroids, 12 (15.4%) methotrexate, 55 (70.5%) azathioprine/mercaptopurine, 42 (53.8%) biologics, and 38 (48.7%) antibiotics. Post-intervention, the median number of reproductive concerns decreased from 3 to 1, and remained, 6+ months later (p<0.001*). Individual concerns are visualized in Figure 1 for all time points. The median BMQ score decreased from 28 to 25, and remained 6+ months later (p=0.032*). The median BMQ scores significantly decreased post-intervention for concerns about having to take IBD medication (p=0.006*), becoming too dependent on IBD medication (p=0.041*), and the long-term effects of IBD medication (p=0.036*). The percentage of participants adherent to medications also increased from 82.4% to 87.8% post-intervention (p=0.099). figure 1.png


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Using an e-health portal reduced IBD-specific reproductive and medication concerns for IBD patients. Medication adherence was high and correlated with beliefs of necessity (BMQ). Pregnancy in IBD patients should be referred to high quality (readable, interactive, up-to-date) educational resources, particularly when they are unable to attend specialized clinics / consultation. Our study suggests these may have beneficial and longstanding implications for knowledge, concern, and medication adherence.


      140 Character Summary:
      After accessing an innovative e-health portal, women with inflammatory bowel disease had lowered concerns regarding reproduction and medications.

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      OS13.03 - Online Patient Health Portals: A Survey of Public Perceptions

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Alicia Polachek

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Secure, comprehensive health information exchange among the care team—including patients—is foundational to high quality, continuous health care. Despite this, many Canadian jurisdictions do not have an integrated system that communicates health information to all care providers or allows patients to access or contribute to their health records. The use of online patient health portals is therefore being considered or implemented in various jurisdictions to enhance access to health information. Given increasing interest in online patient health portals, this study examined public perceptions regarding the use of online patient health portals to access, manage, and share health information.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Public perceptions were examined using an electronic questionnaire that was accessible from October 23 to December 8, 2017. The questionnaire included both closed- and open-ended questions regarding who should have access to their health information, what information and functions should be available in online patient health portals, how people would like to interact with their care team, and perceived benefits and concerns of using online patient health portals. The study was advertised through various electronic, radio, and print media to recruit a voluntary sample of English-speaking Albertans over the age of 18 with valid Alberta Health Care numbers. Responses were received from 1530 respondents. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and plots, while qualitative data from open-ended responses was analyzed using inductive thematic analysis.


      Finding/Results:
      Respondents supported the use of online patient health portals to access, manage, and share health information. Most respondents (92%) agreed that people should have access to their health information through online patient health portals, including information such as medication and medical history, specialist reports, and test results. Furthermore, respondents agreed that parents (71%) should have access to their child’s portal, as should alternate decision makers (81%) when adults are unable to understand or manage health information. Respondents also agreed that they would like online patient health portals to be used to communicate with providers (79%) and share (90%) information within the care team for the purposes of care. Respondents noted many potential benefits related to the use of online patient health portals, including improved care coordination, opportunities for patients to be informed about their health and health care, and access to one’s health information from any location, at any time. Despite overall support, respondents also identified several important concerns. In particular, many respondents (52%) were very concerned about information security and the possibility of health information being accessed by those outside the direct care team. Nevertheless, most respondents (84%) agreed that the benefits outweighed the concerns.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      These results suggest that the public holds positive views regarding the use of online patient health portals. Despite some concerns, the public is keen for such portals to be implemented, emphasizing that any concerns could be mitigated through careful attention to how the portals are implemented, governed, and monitored. Given this strong support, Canadian jurisdictions should continue to consider the greater use of online patient health portals that allow for improved health information exchange among the entire care team, including patients.


      140 Character Summary:
      Despite some important concerns, most Albertans support the use of online patient health portals for accessing, managing, and sharing their health information.

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      OS13.04 - Implementing a Patient Portal in Fraser Health

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Brianne Bourdon

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Fraser Health partnered with Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre to implement the MyChart patient portal. MyChart recognizes that patients are the central stakeholders in their health care and streamlines how a patient's health record is accessed and shared. In fall of 2018, Fraser Health implemented the MyChart patient portal to the renal patient population as a targeted initial launch. The objectives of implementing a patient portal to the Fraser Health patient population were threefold: to provide patients with access to their health record, to enable patients to access to their health information from anywhere at any time, and to improve the process for release of information.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Fraser Health used a proof of concept methodology for the initial launch of the MyChart patient portal. The renal program was chosen as the targeted patient population and clinician group for the proof of concept. Renal patients are invested and knowledgeable in their health care and regularly access the renal program and Fraser Health facilities. The Fraser Health instance of MyChart used an iterative approach in which eHealth, professional practice, the renal program, and patients were partnered to design and build the system and incorporate change management at project onset. A logic model was used to design the evaluation of the proof of concept.


      Finding/Results:
      There are several findings and learnings from the project phase of the Fraser Health MyChart patient portal. Although it is a patient portal, it is important to engage clinicians early. Clinicians are advocates for the patient and improvements to patient care. The renal clinician team is excited for the patient portal and have been strong change agents supporting communications and change management activities. As well, it is important to engage clinicians early along with health records and professional practice to bring awareness to patients’ ability to view their records. This has implications to release of information and clinician documentation practices.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      This proof of concept will be used to inform the next phases for Fraser Health’s patient portal. Future phases will include new patient populations onboarding and enabling more features via integrations to MyChart. Two such features include integrations to the provincial lab information system and provincial diagnostic imaging viewer. This will be pioneering to provide to patients as these provincial systems are presently intended for clinician viewing. The evaluation of the proof of concept will also help inform how Fraser Health approaches subsequent rollouts of MyChart: big bang or by patient population.


      140 Character Summary:
      Fraser Health implemented a patient portal and used the renal program for the proof of concept initial launch that will inform next phases for the patient portal.

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    OS14 - Keeping Patients Healthy at Home

    • 10:00 - 11:00
    • 5/28/2019
    • Location: Area 2
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS14.01 - Using Wound Monitoring Technologies to Demonstrate System-Level Digital Health Barriers

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Leah Kelley

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      WIHV collaborates with the National Research Council’s Industrial Research Assistance Program to provide advice to small-to-medium size enterprises in the digital health sector. Innovators experience several system-level barriers, including a lack of visible incentives to providers and patients to adopt such solutions. We use a collection of wound care applications accessing our program as a window to demonstrate recurring system-level barriers to their adoption.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Three digital wound monitoring applications were assessed through our program. For the purpose of this analysis, we focused on the use of wound monitoring applications in patients accessing provincially-funded homecare services. We extracted system barriers to successful clinical integration and placed these barriers within the context of current funding and incentive models.


      Finding/Results:
      Three primary system challenges to integrating a digital virtual wound care solution into the homecare setting were identified: *1) Unclear payer: There is no obvious payer for most digital solutions; incentives aligned to in-person visits so virtual care often creates cost for the user despite system savings. 2) Lack of integration with surrounding system: Key processes, such as escalation in the care pathway if adverse events occur, are poorly defined. 3) Lack of data governance models*: There are no consistent processes for defining who is responsible to capture data, who must review it, and where it should reside. The value propositions for homecare agencies and clinicians to purchase and utilize wound monitoring apps are unclear, despite potential improvements in patient health outcomes (Table 1). First, the benefits may be accrued elsewhere in the system (e.g. reduced emergency department utilization). Second, the siloing of homecare from key participants in the tool’s success (e.g. primary care providers and dermatologists), creates a system whereby homecare must try to govern processes where they have no control. It is essential to capture the value proposition of the tool for each relevant stakeholder, especially payers and users, as these value propositions may not be aligned. The challenge is to create “wins” for all core parties. A non-bundled, fee-for-service context given is a significant disincentive for institutions to adopt a virtual service model. Alternatively, outcomes-based bundles could offset some disincentives by encouraging institutions to improve outcomes through methods (e.g. virtual technology) that maximize their efficiency. Table 1. Understanding stakeholder funding and value propositions Stakeholder Payment Engagement Value proposition Homecare agency/PSW Fee-for-service (in-person) Use application to monitor healing; Escalate care as needed Fewer visits of value because high homecare demand Primary care provider Fee-for-service (in-person/e-consult) Review application data; Escalate to specialist if needed No incentive to reduce in-person visits Dermatologist Fee-for-service (in-person/e-consult) Review application data in consult No value proposition Local Health Integration Network Fixed homecare budget from Ministry Purchase application If app reduces visits, can increase patient coverage


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The current system creates an entanglement of complex incentives and payment models that stifle the success of digital innovations. Outcomes-based funding models, such as bundled payments to homecare agencies, would enable institutions and clinicians to utilize innovations to improve the quality and efficiency of care provision, as demonstrated by the above use case.


      140 Character Summary:
      Digital health solutions face barriers in system incentives due to funding models; use case of wound monitoring application demonstrates key challenges.

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      OS14.02 - Spreading Provider-to-Provider Remote Consult Solutions: Lessons from a Pan-Canadian Collaborative

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Neil Drimer

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Long wait times for specialist care is one of the most significant problems in Canadian healthcare. Remote consultation has emerged as an innovative approach to address this issue. Two leading Canadian initiatives, the Champlain BASETM eConsult service and BC’s Rapid Access to Consultative Expertise (RACETM) telephone advice line, are at the vanguard of enhanced provider-to-provider communication and were spread as part of the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement’s (CFHI) Connected Medicine Collaborative. CFHI launched this 18-month Collaborative in June 2017 to support 11 pan-Canadian teams to adopt and adapt RACE™ and/or BASE™ to their local contexts. This session will present an overview of the Collaborative, including an introduction to the RACE™ and BASE™ services, outline the approach used to scale and spread the innovations across jurisdictions, including methods of addressing technological and workflow challenges associated with the new systems, and to showcase Collaborative results. The session will include perspectives from CFHI, the RACE™ and BASE™ innovators as well as patients and providers who use the remote consult services.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Overall, BASE™ results show that 40% of cases in the service avoid unnecessary face-to-face specialist referral. RACE™ results show that 60% of calls avoid an unnecessary face-to-face specialist visit, and 32% avoid an unnecessary ED visit. Additionally, these services are shown to enhance the experience of care for both the provider and patient. The Collaborative aimed to support the spread of these services and produce similar impressive results through an in-person workshop, 14 interactive webinars, and direct coaching with expert faculty. Many teams designed for provincial scale or jurisdictional spread with active engagement from their respective regional health authority or Ministries of Health and key regional stakeholders. The Collaborative design and innovative technology solutions pushed towards three overall aims: 1. Support participating healthcare delivery organizations design, implement and evaluate remote consult solutions to improve primary care access to specialist consultation; 2. Improve the quality and experience of care for patients and providers using remote consultation; and 3. Build organizational proficiency and capacity in quality improvement and change management.


      Finding/Results:
      Final collaborative data will be available before the eHealth Conference. Measurement plans and data collection strategies were co-developed by CFHI and teams and include a range of qualitative and quantitative results that address topics such as: quality of care, patient experience, policy and culture changes as well as sustainability, spread and scale of the models. Preliminary data collected throughout the collaborative indicates that teams are adding specialties, the models are reducing unnecessary referrals, improving timely access to specialist care, consult requests are often being answered in less time than required, and patients and providers are responding positively to the service.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The Collaborative specifically addressed issues of continuation beyond the program, including questions around remuneration policies, return on investment of the models, sustainability and spread. While we are working together to support continued implementation, we believe that these models should continue to be supported in their spread and scale across Canada, as they positively impact patient care as well as provider satisfaction.


      140 Character Summary:
      Results and lessons learned from spreading remote consult services for better patient care through a pan-Canadian quality improvement collaborative.

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      OS14.03 - Leveraging Smart Home Technology for Monitoring of Behavioural Risk Factors

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Kirti Sundar Sahu

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      The UbiLab is developing an innovative health surveillance platform to improve monitoring of behavioural risk factors using real-world data collected through smart home technologies. This powerful system will be able to deliver real-time health insights to public health professionals. The purpose of this project is to explore individual- and household-level health indicators collected in the home via smart thermostats. This method enables the delivery of personalized insights to monitor individual- and population-level health behaviours.


      Methodology/Approach:
      The Ubilab partnered with ecobee, a Canadian smart wi-fi thermostat company, leveraging ecobee’s technology and data from over 10,000 households in North America collected through the Donate Your Data (DYD) program. A small pilot study (n = 8) was done to validate the use of sensor readings of movement between rooms through a cross comparison with Fitbits. The DYD dataset was analyzed for patterns using Python, pandas, Elasticsearch, and Kibana.


      Finding/Results:
      A positive association between Fitbit and ecobee data was found (Spearman’s Correlation coefficient = 0.7, p > 0.001) from 380 person hours from the pilot study. Indicators (sleep, interrupted sleep, daily indoor activity, sedentary) based on the Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Sleep (PASS) Indicators Framework from the Public Health Agency of Canada were measured using DYD data. Single occupant ecobee households in Canada averaged 7.2 hours of sleep in 24-hours, 2.1 hours of interrupted sleep, were active for 85 minutes daily, and spent 4.44 hours being sedentary. Traditionally, PASS indicators are measured through surveys including the Canadian Health Measures Survey, and the Canadian Community Housing Survey administered by Statistics Canada. Using this technology, it is possible to enable public health agencies to collect additional novel health indicators, monitor health in real-time and deliver health insights to Canadians to increase health literacy. Since presenting at eHealth 2018, we have improved data collection adding Fitbit Charge 2 HRs, upgrading to capture sleep and heart rate not previously possible with the Fitbit Zip. Adding more sensors functionality is crucial for our algorithm modifications, this includes collecting additional data via the Samsung SmartThings Hub, (presence in the home via Bluetooth), bedroom light usage, and luminance. ecobee is sharing participants and data from their own study, increasing variability within data. We have improved our data storing and analysis process, moving the big data architecture from python to Elastic Stack for real-time data streaming and analysis. We are also actively collaborating with PHAC and improving our algorithm and analysis process using their feedback.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      This is a key opportunity to innovate traditional data collection methods, empowering patients through education and leveraging technology infrastructures to enable healthcare and policy decisions to be made with relevant and real-time data. Lessons learned at the individual and community health levels will be shared with community members and researchers. Implications include understanding short-term impacts with minimal effort and new health policies at the community level. This awareness and improvement can help to better physical activity, sleep and sedentary behaviour which may result in improvements in overall health and wellbeing.


      140 Character Summary:
      Smart home technology platform to visualize and understand in-home health behaviours and monitor chronic disease risk at a population level

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      OS14.04 - TEC4Home COPD: Home Health Monitoring to Improve Outcomes

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Jennifer Cordeiro

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality, reduced quality of life, and significant health system utilization due to frequent Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. TEC4Home COPD is a benefits evaluation examining how Home Health Monitoring (HHM) technology can integrate into the health system to support patients with COPD at home after leaving the hospital or clinic to improve outcomes, including: 90-day ED revisits and hospitalizations, Length of Stay (LOS), quality of life and self-efficacy.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Patient participants were recruited from the Emergency Departments (ED), in-patient, and out-patient units at 3 hospital sites and various COPD community programs in an open trial study design. Upon enrollment, all participants received a HHM device kit supplied by TELUS Health, which includes a tablet, blood pressure cuff, pulse oximeter, weight scale and pedometer. Participants submitted biometric measurements (i.e. blood pressure, oxygen saturation, pulse and weight) and answered a series of yes/no questions about their symptoms (ex. I feel more short of breath today) on the tablet daily over 60 days. Monitoring data was reviewed by monitoring nurses, who followed up on signs of deterioration, shared monitoring updates with the participants’ primary care providers, and provided COPD education to participants over the phone. Pre- and post- surveys comprised of validated scales were used to collect and compare data about quality of life, self-efficacy, healthcare utilization, and overall experience. Administrative data related to ED visits, hospital admissions and LOS were accessed to assess impact on healthcare service utilization.


      Finding/Results:
      Seventy five patient participants were enrolled in the study (61% male/ 39% female; average age 71 years) over a 10-month period. Early preliminary analyses (n=31) of the administrative data showed a decrease in overall ED visits and hospital admissions, along with a decrease in the median LOS when comparing the 90-day periods before and after patient participation in TEC4Home COPD. Further, pre-to-post survey results showed some improvement (not statistically significant) in quality of life and self-efficacy regarding COPD self-management. Overall, participants expressed satisfaction with the TEC4Home COPD HHM program. Results and recommendations from the full final analysis will be shared at the eHealth 2019 conference. This will include an overall pre-to-post comparison on identified outcomes (i.e. healthcare utilization, quality of life and self-efficacy). Further, it will include a sub-analysis and comparison of outcomes for participants enrolled immediately following an exacerbation versus those in stable condition to highlight differences.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      This trial demonstrated improved outcomes for COPD patients using HHM, and will provide insights in to how this technology can be used for patients in exacerbation versus stable condition to best support them at home after hospitalizations or clinic visits. This work is submitted on behalf of the TEC4Home Healthcare Innovation Community.


      140 Character Summary:
      How can Home Health Monitoring be used to support better outcomes for COPD patients after leaving the hospital or clinic?

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    OS15 - Analytics Leads the Way

    • 10:00 - 11:00
    • 5/28/2019
    • Location: Area 3
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS15.01 - Enhancing Healthcare Accessibility for Canadians Through Virtual Care Technology

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Chris Engst

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Rising costs and overwhelming demand for Family Physicians are key challenges facing the Canadian Healthcare system. Over 5 million Canadians are without a Family Physician and over 77% of Canadians don’t have access to healthcare on evenings, weekends, or holidays outside of the emergency room. Virtual Care has the potential to address these challenges by complementing existing healthcare models with new digital health technologies such as Artificial Intelligence to offer timely and efficient communication between healthcare professionals and their patients.


      Methodology/Approach:
      This session aims to provide insights into the adoption of Virtual Care technology, how Canada can stand to benefit, and will touch upon the following topics: 1) Global and Canadian trends in Virtual Care
      2) Emergence of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning in Health
      3) Virtual Care in practice


      Finding/Results:
      The global market for Virtual Care/Telemedicine was $21 billion in 2017, and is forecasted to reach $93 billion by 2026. Rising healthcare costs as well as adoption of 5G spectrum technologies make Virtual Care an attractive complement to existing healthcare models. A recent study by the Canadian Medical Association found that 3 out of 4 Canadians believe that new technologies could solve existing issues in our healthcare system. In Canada, favourable consumer sentiment and current fee code regulations have paved the way for the emergence of new Virtual Care start-ups along with entrants backed by established health players including Babylon by TELUS Health. The development of Virtual Care is also being shaped by innovations in AI and Machine Learning. A recent collaboration between Babylon Health, a London-based Digital Health company and the Royal College of Physicians, Stanford Primary Care and Yale New Haven Health demonstrated the powerful application of AI to interpret medical information. The wide-ranging applications of AI include triaging patients before interacting with live healthcare professionals, as well as supporting practicing physicians in enhancing patient care. In practice, Virtual Care has achieved mass adoption in countries ranging from Rwanda to the UK. In Rwanda, Babylon Health partnered with the Rwandan government to develop an SMS-based Virtual Care solution that has provided care to over 2 million Rwandans to date. In the UK, Babylon Health also partnered with the NHS to develop GP at Hand, an app-based Virtual Care solution that had over 50,000 registered users within the first few months of launch. These innovative and vastly different implementation models showcase the impact Virtual Care coupled with AI can have on a healthcare system.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      New technology and services are needed to empower physicians to provide quality care to underserved rural communities, Canadians living with mobility issues or those without access to non-emergency healthcare on evenings and weekends. New models such as Babylon by TELUS Health aim to reduce barriers to care while maintaining continuity with the existing public healthcare system. Developments in Virtual Care and AI present an opportunity to make a profound impact on the way Canadians access care for both end users and providers by providing increased safety, efficiency and cost savings throughout.


      140 Character Summary:
      Virtual Care technology will allow Canadians to access quality care and communicate efficiently with healthcare professionals no matter where they are located.

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      OS15.02 - Availability and Utilization of Virtual Care and e-Services in Canada

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Chad Leaver

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Digital health technologies to support patient care at a distance (virtual visits) have long been available in Canada, largely through a broad suite of telehealth programs and service providers. Innovation in some international health systems has seen citizen utilization of virtual visits grow to over 50% of annual healthcare interactions. Canada’s digital health sector and healthcare marketplace are advancing availability and accessibility options for virtual visits, yet the current proportion of care in Canada that is virtual is not currently known.


      Methodology/Approach:
      We completed two national surveys between February and March 2018. The Canadian physician survey used a multi-method promotion and recruitment strategy with direct-distribution to over 45,000 primary care and specialist physicians in Canada currently listed in the Canadian Medical Directory (CMD). Physicians could complete the survey manually or online. A general population survey of Canadians was recruited from multiple online panel sources to ensure a representative sample of Canadians by age, sex, province; and rural and remote communities. Both surveys were administered in French and English and focused on access and utilization of virtual care and other e-services in Canada. We used descriptive and cross-tabular analyses to determine the current availability and use of virtual care and to estimate the proportion care in Canada that is currently virtual.


      Finding/Results:
      A total of 2,406 Canadians completed the general population survey; and 1,393 physicians: primary care (n=799); and specialists (n=594) completed the Canadian Physician Survey. Canadian’s interest in accessing virtual care and other e-services is trending positively with significant increases from 2016 for e-Rx renew, e-view, e-booking, e-visit (e-mail and messaging), and virtual visits (+4% to +8% increase). 6% of Canadians report they can currently visit with their health care provider virtually online by video, 3% of Canadians have done so in the past year. Men were more likely than women (5% vs. 2%); and younger Canadians (<35yrs) were more likely than older Canadians to have had a virtual visit in the past year. Virtual visit coordination was either patient initiated or coordinated by regular care provider/specialist clinics. Most virtual visits (53%) were conducted at a health care facility, with the remaining 47% in the patient’s home. For patient initiated virtual visits in the past year, 49% were of no charge to Canadians; the remaining 51% were charged a one-time (per visit) fee. Of the healthcare interactions reported by respondents to our survey 1.6% of these were virtual in 2018. Results from our physician survey highlight virtual care and e-services currently provided by physicians in Canada and key facilitators to advancing physician adoption and use.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Canadians are increasingly interested in accessing virtual care and digitally enabled health services, yet currently only small percentage of Canadians say they can do so. We estimate that in 2018 1.6% of visits in Canada were virtual. Greater consultation to refine our methodology and assumptions informing this estimate and future trending is warranted. In order to realize the estimated health system value of virtual care, enabling citizen access, clinical practice integration and physician remuneration will be essential.


      140 Character Summary:
      Canadians are increasingly interested in virtual care. We estimate that in 2018 1.6% of healthcare visits in Canada were virtual face-to-face consultations.

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      OS15.03 - HIMSS Analytics's INFRAM Will Change How Healthcare Views Infrastructure Forever

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Shanti Gidwani

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      We hear about organizations all over the world making enormous investments in EMR implementations – millions (sometimes billions) of dollars. The EMR rollout, that’s the exciting part – the opportunity for a healthcare organization to move from paper charts to a digital modality that touts efficiency returns, broader access to patient data, comprehensive clinical workflows and more. But all too often, the infrastructure upon which these highly complex systems must ride on are neglected or even forgotten; and if it isn’t current (i.e. powerful enough to support the application), Day 1 of a new launch can be disastrous. And guess who/what the clinicians blame? The application they are using, when perhaps it is the aging infrastructure it is riding on that is causing the issue… Enter the HIMSS Analytics's INFRAM (the INFRastructure Adoption Model). This model guides organizations through a specific process and assessment, and at the end creates a bespoke infrastructure architecture roadmap. The organization can then use this to map out their specific technology requirements based on what they already have in place, and where they want to go. If you’ve heard of the HIMSS EMRAM (Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model), you will quickly realize that the INFRAM goes hand in hand with the EMRAM and its corresponding levels. So if you think your organization is an EMRAM level 4, you can verify this by undertaking the INFRAM assessment and then planning the strategic architecture to get to a level 6 or even 7 – also known to some as EMR nirvana. This talk will discuss the underlying principles of INFRAM, how it is linked to EMRAM and why health care leaders should care about this. Global announcements will be made on October 24th about INFRAM on the HIMSS Analytics website. For now, please refer to these two links. https://www.himssanalytics.org/news/infram-criteria-healthcare-infrastructure-maturity and https://gblogs.cisco.com/ca/2018/07/25/what-the-heck-is-the-infram-and-why-should-i-care-about-it/


      Methodology/Approach:
      This talk will outline how the INFRAM was developed, what it entails and why HIMSS Analytics asked for the intellectual property.


      Finding/Results:
      This part of the talk will discuss the number of INFRAM assessments done to date and how effective they have been.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      This part of the talk will include a call to action for those in the healthcare technology space.


      140 Character Summary:
      INFRAM will forever change how organizations can create strategic plans mapping infrastructure investments to their clinical application implementations.

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      OS15.04 - Assessing Quality of Mobile Applications in Chronic Disease Management

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Payal Agarwal

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      There has been great excitement and growth in the mobile health field, with over 40,000 new health and wellness apps. However, due to a lack of regulatory systems, it is likely that many of these apps are of poor quality, posing potential risks to patients -- including privacy breaches, wasted resources and poor clinical outcomes. In order to fully realize the potential of mobile technologies to improve care, health systems require validated methods for selecting and evaluating the quality of apps. The goal of this project is to complete a scoping review of the literature exploring the criteria authors use to assess the quality of mobile health apps outside of formal experimental evaluation, particularity for chronic disease management. Through this process, we aim to help clinicians, patients and system decision makers find and support high quality apps that have the potential to improve care and impact health outcomes.


      Methodology/Approach:
      We conducted a scoping review of Cochrane and MEDLINE databases to systematically find articles that include a direct review and assessment of quality for two or more patient-facing mobile applications intended to promote chronic disease management. Our search strategy included search terms representing 2 concepts: 1) mobile applications and 2) chronic disease. We excluded studies that evaluated apps through an empiric experimental design. All abstracts were screened for inclusion by 2 trained project team members and discrepancies were resolved by the principal investigators. For each article, we extracted all utilized quality criteria and conducted a thematic analysis using an inductive coding process.


      Finding/Results:
      Our initial search resulted in 8182 potential articles for inclusion. Ultimately, 66 articles were included in the final sample. The synthesized list of quality criteria resulted in 7 broad themes: 1) behavior change, 2) evidence of impact, 3) general characteristics, 4) health information quality, 5) technical features, 6) user experience and 7) user engagement. Overall, there was significant variability in the criteria authors used to measure quality. Readily available measures, such as user ratings (n=20) and price (n=25), were some of the most commonly used quality criteria. Despite the important place of privacy and security within digital health technologies, only 10 articles used security and 12 used privacy as a measure of quality. The inclusion of user engagement features, self-monitoring in particular (n=45), was the most popular method to assess quality. However, most articles based their review on the assumption that more engagement features were related to higher quality; based on the literature, this assumption is likely incorrect. Many reviewers recognized the importance of incorporating behavior change techniques into health apps (n=27), but there was rarely the explicit use of a validated frameworks for identifying evidence based techniques.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The high number of articles found for inclusion in our review suggests a strong interest in using quality criteria to evaluate mobile health apps. However, the immense variability of included criteria indicates the need for a comprehensive, standardized framework to identify health applications that deserve further support and use by the health system.


      140 Character Summary:
      A scoping review of 66 articles exploring criteria used to assess the quality of mobile health apps for chronic disease management.

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    OS16 - Unleashing Telehealth

    • 10:00 - 11:00
    • 5/28/2019
    • Location: Area 4
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track:
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      OS16.01 - Unlocking the Possibilities: Telehealth in Corrections

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Linda Bridges

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      While most health services and some specialty health services are provided within federal institutions, the majority of specialist consultations take place in the community. In 2010 the federal offender population in the Atlantic region demonstrated a significant increase. Two thirds of this offender population were in institutions within the geographic area served by Horizon Health Network (Horizon), New Brunswick’s largest Regional Health Authority. The increase resulted in a corresponding rise in the number of offenders visiting Horizon facilities, where many of the community specialists worked. To put this in perspective, during an 11 month period, 880 federal medical escorts from Westmorland Institution and Dorchester Penitentiary, two of New Brunswick’s correctional institutions, were performed. This was an average of 80 escorts per month. Analysis of these escorts determined that 294, or one third of these could have been completed using telehealth processes and technology. That year, Horizon and Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), resulting in a Telecorrections Partnership Project. The intended benefits were; to increase staff / patient safety by reducing and/or eliminating inmate transfers to The Moncton Hospital, provide an important opportunity for a broader range of medical specialists to deliver services via telehealth, and lastly to reduce security costs related to inmate transfers to and from this hospital.


      Methodology/Approach:
      Clinical and technical team members worked together under rigorous project management to review exisiting referral patterns and technological challenges.The clinical focus was the provision of medical services by plastic surgery,general surgery and ENT specialists. Expansion to other specialties within the 12 month time frame of the project ocurred as opportunities were identified and parties were in agreement. The deliverables of the project were; that both connectivity and interoperability be established between the hospital and the two CSC sites laying the foundation for future expansion of telehealth between other hospitals in the NB and CSC facilities. This came to fruition based on the results documented in the Final Evaluation Report and development of a Telecorrections Tool Kit. Both health professionals and clients reported satisfaction with this mode of safe service delivery.


      Finding/Results:
      Telecorrections has increased staff and patient safety by reducing or eliminating the need for inmate transfers to receive specialty care. Security costs and potential opportunity for elopement associated with escorts have been reduced. One tremendous advantage has been the ongoing knowledge transfer which occurs during these assessments for those CSC clinicians involved. Having these same clinicians present during sessions has been pivotal to maintain an open dialogue and general facilitation. This initiative provided the confidence and experience within Horizon to begin the recent provision of services to provincial correctional facilities as well.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      The Telecorrections model of care adheres to all national Telehealth Accreditation Standards and firmly established the practice of Telehealth in the CSC Atlantic Region. This presentation will describe the outcomes of this initiative and how Telehealth in Corrections continues to assist CSC Health Services in providing essential health services to offenders while contributing to public safety.


      140 Character Summary:
      Accessing scarce clinical resources to increase patient and public safety via the use of Telehealth.

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      OS16.02 - Designing Telemonitoring for Complex Patients in a NP-Led Clinic

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Kayleigh Gordon

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Complex patients are becoming increasingly prevalent throughout Ontario’s healthcare system, and yet chronic care continues to be focused on single conditions treated individually, often without consideration of greater care needs. An opportunity has arisen to address the challenges that complex patients face by combining the two innovations: telemonitoring and a Nurse Practitioner (NP)-led integrated complex medical clinic. Using a telemonitoring system in the NP-led clinic, patients will be able to monitor their multiple chronic conditions at home through a smart-phone based telemonitoring application. By leveraging patients’ ability to manage and initiate self-care at home, patients are given opportunities to participate in care and could mitigate adverse events. However, very few TM programs are sustained as part of clinical care, and those programs that exist are restricted to single conditions. The objective of this work is to determine the needs and requirements of a telemonitoring system which assists self-management of multiple complex chronic conditions. The results of a qualitative needs assessment and iterative usability testing will be reported.


      Methodology/Approach:
      A qualitative needs assessment and usability evaluation were undertaken as part of a larger case study to determine how to design and implement telemonitoring as a single system for complex conditions into an NP-led integrated clinic model. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to determine the specific needs and requirements of complex patients and anticipated challenges of implementing telemonitoring in this model. Interviews were also utilized to iterate on the telemonitoring application. Patients and care team members were recruited using snowball sampling. The investigators used conventional content analysis to interpret interview responses and obtain more detailed understanding of their needs, perspectives and challenges around managing complex chronic conditions, as well as any technical needs and requirements for a telemonitoring system.


      Finding/Results:
      Eighteen patients and thirteen care team members were interviewed to reach data saturation at WOHS. Patient interviewees were particularly interested in how telemonitoring could improve access to necessary health care services, coordinate overall care needs and symptoms under more consistent monitoring by multiple health care professionals in one place. The majority of patients felt telemonitoring could be helpful for managing blood pressure, monitoring blood sugar levels, pain, and possibly even mental health concerns, such as anxiety or depression. Usability testing is ongoing and preliminary analysis has informed application development as it occured in order to be contextually relevant. Up to two rounds of formal usability testing are anticipated before the application will be operationalized in the clinic model as a pilot study in January 2019.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Based on this research, a six-month multi-method pilot study will be undertaken to determine the feasibility of implementing telemonitoring into the NP-led clinic model. The potential impact of this research includes a sustained program combining telemonitoring within this model which improves health outcomes, reduces unnecessary ED visits or hospitalizations and is scalable to other healthcare institutions for complex patients.


      140 Character Summary:
      Complex patients and their clinicians perceived a smartphone-based TM system in a NP led model to be an opportunity to better manage their health and care needs.

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      OS16.03 - Telenephrology and the Elimination of Geography for Hemodialysis Patients

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Krisan Palmer

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      Telehealth promotes access to those scarce clinical resources most often located in more urban settings to which patients must travel large distances to receive treatment. Prior to the establishment of Horizon Health Network’s first satellite hemodialysis unit, patients requiring this life sustaining care had to do just that three times every week. The goal in establishing satelitte hemodialysis units was to ensure safe, comprehensive and evidence based local care for this vulnerable patient population by eliminating the geography between them and their nephrologist using Telehealth processes and technology.


      Methodology/Approach:
      In order for a satelitte unit to be established, the physical, technical and clinical environment must be replicated to match those of the main Dialysis center. The same clinical standards of care that are adhered to by the Nephrology Program clinicians in the main dialysis unit must be operationalized and maintained in the satelitte unit. This includes the weekly patient rounds conducted by the nephrologist in conjunction with the nurses at the patient’s chair side or treatment station while undergoing dialysis. In order for this to occur at a distance, Telehealth must be employed. The Nephrologist at the main unit connects to the satelitte unit via a real-time interactive audio and video telehealth modality and is able to discuss the patient’s treatment plan with both the patient and the nurse together, just as it would occur if the patient was being treated in the same building as the Nephrologist. This is what has become known as Telenephrology.


      Finding/Results:
      Currently there are four satellite units established and they treat 94 patients per week. Three of them are open six days a week and one operates three days each week. This eliminates 158 round trips per patient each year.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Teledialysis is a safe and patient centric healthcare delivery mechanism that should be explored by all Regional Health Authorities currently offering Nephrology services.


      140 Character Summary:
      Elimination of geography thrice weekly for Dialysis patients.

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      OS16.04 - Virtual Palliative Care: Supporting Patients in Their Home

      10:00 - 11:00  |  Author(s): Angela Nickoloff

      • Abstract

      Purpose/Objectives:
      A report released by Health Quality Ontario, Palliative Care at the End of Life (2016), advocates for early palliative care intervention as well as support for care in the location of choice. The report found that although most Ontarians prefer to receive palliative care and die at home, the majority die in hospital. The report also found that caregivers, who play a critical role for patients with a terminal or chronic illness, experience burnout which is a key contributor to trips to the emergency room for patients in the last stages of life. Evidence shows that virtual care solutions are effective in monitoring patient symptoms and that team-based care with direct patient contact significantly increases the likelihood of dying at home. The purpose of this demonstration project was to support patients with a progressive life limiting illness who prefer to receive care in their home. The objectives were to promote earlier identification of patient needs, improve patient and caregiver experience with care delivery, increase access for patients and families to resources, and improve patient outcomes.


      Methodology/Approach:
      The Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) worked with partners in the Champlain LHIN to co-design a virtual palliative care model that would enable a regional system with capacity for the delivery of in-home palliative care. Patients responded to a series of self-assessment surveys on a tablet from their home. Care providers received real-time feedback on the patient’s information which triggered specific events and corrective actions. Program evaluation included patient, caregiver and clinician experience and acute health service usage.


      Finding/Results:
      A total of 118 patients with an average Palliative Performance Scale score of 50% were enrolled in the project. In terms of patient satisfaction, 87% were satisfied with the experience; 85% were satisfied with the coordination of resources, use of technology, and information received; 75% were satisfied with the progress made towards care goals including location of care preference; 74% would recommend the initiative to others; and 73% agreed that virtual care saved them time by not having to travel to see their provider. Patient feedback showed the potential for emergency department usage to decrease from 68% to 27%. Family caregivers reported little to mild burden in caring for loved ones. Clinicians reported that the technology enhanced their ability to do their job, increased efficiency and allowed them to monitor the health conditions of their patient over time.


      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations:
      Virtual palliative care, when integrated into community care models and in the hands of the patient, demonstrated effectiveness in supporting patients with palliative care needs and in decreasing acute health services utilization. There is a need to further model how patient information is consistently reviewed and managed, and how to best leverage existing palliative care teams, specialists and other healthcare providers to ensure necessary follow-up actions are taken.


      140 Character Summary:
      The project aimed to develop a virtual care model to support patients who prefer to receive in-home palliative care.