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F. Ratchford



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    OS06 - Partnership in Care and Outcomes (ID 2)

    • Event: e-Health 2018 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Clinical Delivery
    • Presentations: 1
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      OS06.02 - Partnering with Patients in Digital Health: Experience and Promise (ID 618)

      F. Ratchford, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement; Ottawa/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: Patients, along with their caregivers and family members have been advocating for themselves in the health care space for many years. Recently, digital health has played a prominent role in their advocacy, with the recognition that having access to health information and communication tools to share information with health care providers enables patients to be engaged in their care, and bring more equality to the patient-provider relationship. More recently, a movement within health care, spurred by advocacy, has sought to create a health care system where patients and their families are not only the focus, but take a seat at the table in the design and delivery of care, including through digital health. This panel will discuss the concept of patient partnership from a variety of perspectives, most importantly from that of patients and their caregivers, who will be members of the panel

      Methodology/Approach: Panellists will introduce the concept of patient partnership (sometimes also referred to as patient engagement), the conceptual frameworks that have been developed around it, its implications for organizations in the digital health sector, and describe best practices for implementation. Common myths or perceived roadblocks will also be addressed, including in the Q & A section. The panel will consist of representatives from digital health organizations that have committed to and taken action towards becoming more patient-centred, as well as patient advocates who can draw on their experience both as patients in the heath care system and as the patient partners working towards a health system that partners more effectively with patients.

      Finding/Results: The panel will situate the system-wide movement toward patient partnership within the context of the digital health sector. Digital health organizations have used a variety of tools to better adhere to the concept of patient partnering, including using patient advisory panels, vision-setting workshops, co-design with patients, etc. Panellists will present the accumulated lessons learned from the use of these tools. Patients on the panel will present their point of view as agents of change in the system and as participants in the above processes, and offer their insights into where these tools are appropriate and how they can be applied more effectively.

      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations: Research has shown that partnering with patients is an enriching experience for all involved. Patients feel more empowered and in control of their health, and have greater satisfaction. Job satisfaction and morale has been shown to improve among health sector workers, and patient outcomes improve. Digital health can play a key role in achieving and accelerating these outcomes. This panel will enable attendees to better understand the concepts, tools, and value behind patient partnership.

      140 Character Summary: "Nothing about me, without me". Patients and health orgs discuss, what are the implications for digital health?

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    PS06 - Digital Health Engagement Through Benefits and Data (ID 45)

    • Event: e-Health 2018 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Panel Session
    • Track: Executive
    • Presentations: 1
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      PS06.02 - Txting for #youthmentalhealth: Provider and #ptexp (ID 621)

      F. Ratchford, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement; Ottawa/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: It is estimated that 1.2 million Canadian youth suffer from mental health issues, yet only 20% receive treatment. Yet delivering services to young people can be difficult. There are many reasons young people in need of mental health services may not wish to, or be able to, access traditionally-delivered mental health services. These include the desire for privacy, lack of local services or personal transportation to them, lack of acceptability of using cell phones for talking, limited data plans or bandwidth, etc. Digital health can play a key role in providing accessible and appropriate services to this population. The objective of this session is to provide an overview of the current state of digital mental health in Canada, present the experience of one provider offering a new 24/7 crisis texting line to youth in Canada, and amplify the patient point of view by presenting the patient experience in their own voice. These presentations will inform discussion during the question period around best practices for digital mental health solutions, engaging youth, and adopting a patient-centred approach.

      Methodology/Approach: Youth are increasingly less likely to use telephone or online chat when seeking help. Yet cellphones are nearly ubiquitous, and the use of texting is more acceptable to young people. For this reason, a bilingual, 24-hour, anonymous crisis text service, launched in 2017, provides an opportunity to address this accessibility gap. The crisis line provides service to youth without significant wait times. Using texting eliminates the need to download an app or use a cellphone data plan. The service is available in remote areas and areas that are typically underserved. A texting service allows an easier entry point for a youth in crisis, allowing them to be connected to on-the-ground resources including emergency services and child welfare after engaging with the texting service. The technology platform can be continually improved and lends itself to rigorous monitoring and evaluation. The solution can be integrated into other platforms, such as social media (Facebook, Snapchat, etc.).

      Finding/Results: Data from an initial release across one province will be presented. The data will inform local and national actors on trends and patterns, as well as add to the knowledge base of how young people experience mental health issues, and which words or concepts may be leading indicator for crisis. The data will also show usage patterns and areas of demand, which will provide lessons for scale-up to the national level. The effectiveness of outreach and engagement activities associated with the limited production release will also be assessed. Data from this implementation in Canada will be compared to the experience of other countries.

      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations: The use of texting is an innovative way to provide services for youth in crisis. Its success has implications for how health services are delivered, whether to youth or others. It is a tool with the potential to improve patient experience, the health of the youth population, and contribute to health care system efficiencies.

      140 Character Summary: Digital mental health can be more accessible, acceptable and effective for youth. 24/7 texting crisis service is an opportunity for kids to get help the way they want.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.