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Oliver Thompson



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    OS01 - Implementation: Futuristic Thinking (ID 3)

    • Event: e-Health 2017 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Clinical and Executive
    • Presentations: 1
    • Coordinates: 6/05/2017, 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM, Room 201CD
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      OS01.01 - The Tale of Two Data Conversions (ID 320)

      Oliver Thompson, eHealth, PHSA; Vancouver/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: To share the experience of two vastly different data conversion approaches - the first used vendor supplied tools not fit for the scale and the second used an Enterprise ETL (Extract Transform and Load) software.

      Methodology/Approach: Review scope, approach, and technologies that were used in a two phase approach to data conversions from a legacy system (iPHIS) into BC’s Public Health Information System – Panorama. Phase 1 commenced with business requirements signed off two years prior to the implementation and with inadequate representation from the user community. Tools used were custom made and functioned in small batches, but were not designed for the volume of records. By the time the project team realized the tooling deficiency, the only viable option was to convert 45 million records in batches of 200,000 – a very onerous, labour-intensive, and error-prone process. Following Phase 1, the project re-evaluated its approach and experimented with off-the-shelf ETL (Extract, Transform and Load) software on a minor dataset. With this success, the team created a model for Phase 2 that would leverage an enterprise ETL software, change the project structure and governance, and adopt a ‘phased’ approach with seven incremental releases to users, each with a new set of data.

      Finding/Results: Phase 1 Summary: Scope and Schedule: 44 million records converted over 10 full days plus workday evening conversions from 8pm until 6am for three weeks as well as effort on the weekends. Release Schedule: No opportunity to convert all data in advance of production run Defects: Two and half months required to address high priority bug fixes and missed data. Project Team: Team expanded to address challenges; exhausted team required heroic dedication. Phase 2 Summary: Scope and Schedule: 47.5 million records converted over 22 hours, including a lunch break. Release Schedule: Seven releases for the users to review, including three full production runs. This provided confidence of the quality of data and the process. Defects: Minor defects experienced; majority of team released after three weeks. Project Team: Controlled project environment requiring minimal overtime.

      Conclusion/Implication/Recommendations: A significant investigation of the business signoff, process and tools is required prior to commencing any data conversion project. Use of Enterprise ETL tool was critical to success, and enabled incremental releases which built confidence in data quality and the conversion process. Incremental release did provide users with the ability to ‘see data in the application’ prior to signing off on business rules. While this was useful in many respects, it did require rework from the project team when users didn’t like what they saw.

      140 Character Summary: Data conversion with the appropriate toolset and approach can be successful. For large conversions, an enterprise ETL software is critical.

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    OS14 - Successes in Quality and Efficiency (ID 20)

    • Event: e-Health 2017 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Clinical and Executive
    • Presentations: 1
    • Coordinates: 6/06/2017, 01:00 PM - 02:00 PM, Room 201EF
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      OS14.03 - STIX – A Multiple Provincial, Multiple Ministerial, Multiple Health Authority Implementation (ID 60)

      Oliver Thompson, eHealth, PHSA; Vancouver/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: To share lessons learned and opportunities realized as a result of the implementation of an Ontario Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) application in BC to consume student data from the BC Ministry of Education to share with BC’s Health Authorities in support of Public Health Mass Immunizations programs.

      Methodology/Approach: In 2013, the Ontario MOHTLC developed a tool to support public health school immunization assessment and administration programs. The Student Information Exchange (STIX) tool automates the uploading and matching of student demographic records with the correct records in the provincial immunization repository. BC and Ontario entered into an agreement to share the application code Approval of the minimum data set required to support client matching and public health program requirements Customization of code to meet BC requirements Relationship with the BC Ministry of Education, who worked on behalf of BC’s School Districts, to develop a single extract of student data from their provincial student information system and facilitate collection of the necessary agreements Utilization of a BC Ministry of Health sFTP service to securely transfer data between the BC Ministry of Education and Provincial Health Services Authority Signing of a Provincial Privacy Impact Assessment to allow for the new process Configuration of BC’s Public Health system, Panorama, to accept data Implementation of solution at two Health Authorities, as a pre-curser to wider adoption

      Finding/Results: Hugely successful implementation, laying the foundation for the use of Mass Immunizations functionality in Panorama BC’s project metrics included: 80% return rate of agreements from targeted School Districts within two weeks 84% match rate of data from the Ministry of Education’s system and Panorama 85% reduction in work effort to reconcile student data and 60% reduction in work effort to support Mass Immunization event Clinical and business benefits included: Improved data quality for surveillance and clinical care Mass Imms and Personalized Consent Adoption advancing clinical best practice and use of immunization decision support Per clinic vaccine and supply management preventing wastage Coverage and catch up at school level advancing disease prevention Management of school outbreaks Readiness for legislative change requiring immunization status reporting for all students Presentation will also compare and contrast an assorted challenges each party faced and approaches we took to be successful (e.g., legislative changes required to enable use of the Ontario Education Number; privacy challenges requiring an independent security assessment)

      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations: BC’s public health system benefited significantly from Ontario MOHLT’s investments Workflow improvements were significant enough to enable use of functionality previously deemed too resource intensive Relationships are key to bring project to success Patience is required when dealing with multi-dimensional implementations

      140 Character Summary: Share opportunities realized from the implementation of the Ontario-developed application in BC in support of public health immunization programs.

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    OS28 - Learning to Leverage Technology (ID 33)

    • Event: e-Health 2017 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Clinical and Executive
    • Presentations: 1
    • Coordinates: 6/07/2017, 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM, Room 203AB
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      OS28.03 - Partnership with the BC Services Card to Authenticate eHealth Users (ID 331)

      Oliver Thompson, eHealth, PHSA; Vancouver/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: To share the successful outcome and implementation experience of BC’s first deployment of the Provincial eHealth Viewer (CareConnect) to non-Health Authority users. A key aspect of the project was integrating with the new BC Service Card as the authentication mechanism to identify Canadian Blood Services staff.

      Methodology/Approach: CareConnect is actively used by all six of BC’s Health Authorities (HA). User requests identified a significant interest in providing access to CareConnect to non-Health Authority users. As such, the Provincial Health Services Authority (PHSA) project team created a non-HA Access Model Framework, initially focused on organizations with establish IT infrastructures, privacy and user support departments. The Framework included approaches to address: Technical Deployment Agreements User Access Privacy Security Operational Engagement and Governance process A key issue was how to identify individuals that the Health Authorities have no direct relationship with. The solution was to integrate with the BC Services Card. The BC Services Card replaces BC’s Health Card. It includes a contactless encrypted chip that is linked to identity services and supports online authentication with passcode functionality. In effect, two factor authentication. PHSA and the Ministry of Technology and Citizen Services (MTICS) completed a technical proof of concept which confirmed the technology principles. With governance approval, the project team implemented the solution which included: Integration between the HA's Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) and the BC Service Card infrastructure Creation of a CareConnect logon process for non-HA users, which seamlessly directs the users to the BC Service Card logon service. BC Service Card confirms the correct card and passcode combination, and informs the HA ADFS of a successful authentication, which in turn grants access to CareConnect. Once authentication is complete, users are matched with the role they registered with in CareConnect, and provided with the appropriate access

      Finding/Results: The partnership with the BC Service Card leverages the key strengths of both organizations: BC Services Card’s role is to identify specific individuals and authenticate their online presence to a very high security standard CareConnect enforces a role-based user access model to provide the appropriate content to authenticated user With this implementation, PHSA now has an established process to provide access to Provincial eHealth data to non-HA users who work in established organizations. Canadian Blood Services' staff benefit by having faster access to the information they require to support their clinical activities. While the user experience is very streamlined, there are concerns about employees having to use their personal BC Services Card in a work environment and the initial manual process to obtain passcodes. There were two significant Lessons Learned from the project: The technical infrastructure and network connectivity was extremely complex Multiple legal, privacy and security agreements were required amongst the numerous organizations involved

      Conclusion/Implication/Recommendations: In designing provincial solutions, it is important to look outside the Health sector and create partnerships across Ministries in order to create an ideal solution. While it does add complexity, the first implementation sets the foundation for future growth.

      140 Character Summary: Sharing the successful integration of the new BC Services Card with the Provincial eHealth Viewer in support of providing access to Canadian Blood Services' staff.

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