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M. Leduc



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    OS11 - Connected Care: A Canadian Dream (ID 13)

    • Event: e-Health 2018 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Clinical Delivery
    • Presentations: 1
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      OS11.04 - A Physician's Time Is Precious: Bundling Digital Health Services (ID 40)

      M. Leduc, Product Strategy and Delivery, OntarioMD; Toronto/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: We all recognize that doctors’ time is in short supply. Government and industry across Canada invest tremendous effort and resources to address this challenge, devising new and insightful ways to reduce the time it takes physicians to access and act on information for patient care. Why, then, do so many organizations collectively subject community-based clinicians to an endless barrage of engagements, readiness assessments, and introductions to “something that will make your life easier”? This presentation will examine one jurisdiction’s successful collaboration to engage community-based physicians through a bundled approach – incorporating several different products and services from multiple organizations, and relying on each organization’s strengths to deliver the best value for physicians.

      Methodology/Approach: Insurers, and telecommunications providers offer service bundles for home and auto insurance and phone/cable packages. Spas even offer service bundles for a variety of beauty and wellness services. For our customers, community-based physicians, we partnered with several publicly-funded organizations with digital health or practice efficiency products to offer physicians a package of services through a single engagement – and more value for their effort. (A physician’s time spent assessing a new solution is time not delivering care to patients, so a bundled service offering increases both time available to provide care and revenue associated with such care.) One organization has physician relationships and expertise in the EMR. Another organization delivers infrastructure such as identity services that provide a foundation for provincial digital health products. A third organization specializes in telehealth and virtual healthcare. By leveraging each organization’s strengths, this collaboration offers physicians eight distinct services and ongoing project management and change management support to implement them.

      Finding/Results: Not surprisingly, physicians loved the bundled engagement approach. One contact, one trusted advisor, and one time in their day to focus on digital health opportunities encouraged physicians to really invest the time to understand their options and maximize their benefits. To achieve this unified approach, the partnering organizations ensured that engagement processes were consistent and streamlined, and that information collected for one organization could be leveraged – with physician consent – for another service. An additional advantage of this bundled approach was that physicians were more open to learning about and trying services that would otherwise never have been considered. By funneling engagements through a single relationship, the physician was more apt to see the positives of other solutions (even from different organizations) and take a chance on a new service. This presentation will detail how deployment processes were aligned, and adoption and change management efforts were more productive as a result of the bundled service – benefitting all collaborating organizations as well as the physician practice.

      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations: In addition to cataloguing our successes and learnings along the way, this presentation will include detailed instructions for other organizations interested in bundling services with partner organizations for a streamlined and organized deployment process that maximizes physician practice benefit and stakeholder reach, while reducing the overall cost of implementation. The proven approach used increased physician engagement, improved adoption and reduced system costs.

      140 Character Summary: Bundled service delivery among multiple organizations increases satisfaction and adoption among community-based providers while reducing system costs.

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    OS19 - Expanding EMR Use in Communities (ID 29)

    • Event: e-Health 2018 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Technical/Interoperability
    • Presentations: 1
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      OS19.02 - Electronic Medical Records: Information Aggregators or Gateway Systems? (ID 39)

      M. Leduc, Product Strategy and Delivery, OntarioMD; Toronto/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: Is an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) a machine for aggregating information? Is it a launchpad for accessing broader digital health solutions and national repositories? Is it both? Early EMRs were effectively electronic versions of paper charts – isolated silos of manually entered information. The advent of integrating systems such report manager solutions and laboratory information systems helped the EMR become less isolated and more interconnected with broader sources of information; however, the EMR continued to rely on its own database for supporting patient care. Now, integration efforts with systems such as eConsult and digital health immunization repositories are changing the EMR paradigm. No longer are EMRs standalone systems wherein community-based physicians work, they have become one piece of an interconnected web of independent databases, comprehensive decision-support logic, and tools for legislative compliance. This panel presentation will explore the effect of this evolving role of EMRs on: 1. Physician practices, including their ability to deliver patient care and meet legislative requirements; 2. EMR product vendors, that need to adapt to the changing needs and opportunities for physicians; and 3. The ability for the system to deliver high-quality patient care.

      Methodology/Approach: With a growing number of EMR users and interconnecting systems, it is increasingly difficult for digital health vendors and stakeholders, as well as their physician customers, to continue building tightly-integrated solutions in the EMR – forms and pages developed within the EMR that integrate with external solutions. Increasingly complex decision-support tools and greater quantities of stored data further stress EMR infrastructure as these systems are expected to deliver mass scope on minimal scale. This challenging trend is encouraging loosely-integrated solutions in the EMR – where the EMR passes user and patient context to a partner system, and presents that other system’s pages within the frame of the EMR. Loosely-integrated solutions reduce the burden on the EMR to adapt to ever-changing requirements while still delivering needed functionality to physicians.

      Finding/Results: Loosely-integrated EMR solutions are easier for the product vendors and the evolving system; however, they introduce new challenges for practising physicians: 1. EMR users are faced with an inconsistent and unfamiliar look and feel to their EMRs, as each loosely-integrated solution introduces system-specific layout and features; and 2. Information in support of clinical decision-making that used to be stored within the EMR exists across an array of digital health solutions, complicating a physician’s ability to reflect the best information available at a given time. On the other hand, tightly-integrated EMR models may lead to higher EMR prices and system costs as solution vendors accommodate multiple specifications and system-specific needs. Further, EMR users face the burden of more frequent upgrades and updates to deliver changing functionality to their systems.

      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations: This panel presentation will bring together voices representing community-based physicians, digital health product vendors, and digital health system stakeholders to consider the best path forward for EMRs, the community-based physicians who use them, and the patients who benefit from their care.

      140 Character Summary: Listen to a panel of users and system stakeholders discuss the future of EMRs as either tightly-integrated systems or loosely integrated with external solutions.

      Only Active Members that have purchased this event or have registered via an access code will be able to view this content. To view this presentation, please login or select "Add to Cart" and proceed to checkout.