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M. Kleib



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    EP06 - e-Poster Session 6 (ID 57)

    • Event: e-Health 2018 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: e-Poster Session
    • Track: Executive
    • Presentations: 1
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      EP06.07 - Self-Perceptions and Factors Associated with Informatics Competency Among Registered Nurses (ID 195)

      M. Kleib, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta; Edmonton/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: Purpose: As digital innovations continue to transform health systems in Canada, it is important to examine registered nurses’ readiness in informatics. The purpose of this study was to determine self-perceived informatics competencies, and factors associated with competency amongst practising nurses in Alberta.

      Methodology/Approach: Methods: An exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional survey using the Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale (C-NICAS)—a 21-item comprehensive measure of nurses’ informatics competencies based on the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing’s entry-to-practice informatics competency requirements—was employed.

      Finding/Results: Results: 2844 nurses completed the C-NICAS. Nurses’ self-perceived informatics competency was slightly above the mark of competent. Perceptions of competency were highest on foundational computer literacy skills and lowest on information and knowledge management competencies. However, overall informatics competency mean scores varied significantly in relation to age, educational qualification, years of experience, and work setting. Regression analysis showed the quality of informatics training and support, offered by employers, contributed the most to variance in mean scores of total and sub-domains of informatics competency. Other factors—age; educational qualification; work setting; previous informatics education; access to internet; use of health technology; access to supporting resources; informatics training; an informatics role; and continuing education in informatics—also contributed to variance in mean scores of total and sub-domains of informatics competency; in varying degrees.

      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations: Conclusion: Findings provide a basis for actionable policies to address informatics educational needs and support requirements for nurses practising now and in the future.

      140 Character Summary: A survey of 2844 nurses revealed a number of factors impact perceptions of informatics competency. Actionable strategies are proposed.

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    OS18 - Minding the Gap in Our Healthcare Policies (ID 34)

    • Event: e-Health 2018 Virtual Meeting
    • Type: Oral Session
    • Track: Clinical Delivery
    • Presentations: 1
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      OS18.03 - Psychometric Evaluation of the Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale (ID 194)

      M. Kleib, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta; Edmonton/CA

      • Abstract
      • Slides

      Purpose/Objectives: Purpose: While the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN) has defined entry-to-practice informatics competencies for Registered Nurses, there has been no research-based tool developed to date for the assessment of these competencies. The purpose of this study was to integrate these competencies into a measurement scale and evaluate its psychometric properties. Such a tool would serve to evaluate nurses’ informatics readiness for practice, their learning and continuing education needs related to same, and assist in the planning of targeted informatics education in the workplace.

      Methodology/Approach: Methods: The researchers developed the Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale (C-NICAS)—a 21-item comprehensive measure and applied it into a cross-sectional survey; 2844 nurses from practice settings in Alberta completed the survey. An exploratory principal component analysis with oblique promax rotation was applied to examine the factor structure and internal consistency reliability of the (C-NICAS).

      Finding/Results: Results: Results revealed a four-component/factor structure of the C-NICAS, explaining 61.04% of the variance. Items loading per each component reflected the original Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing’s grouping of nursing informatics competency indicators, as per three key domains of competency: information and knowledge management (? = 0.85); professional and regulatory accountability (? = 0.81); and ICT use in the delivery of patient care (? = 0.87) with the exception of one item (Indicator 3), which loaded into the category of foundational information and communication technology (ICT) skills (? = 0.81).

      Conclusion/Implications/Recommendations: Conclusion: This study provided a preliminary evidence for the construct validity of the entry-to-practice competency domains, and the factor structure and reliability of the C-NICAS among practising nurses. Further testing among nurses in other settings and among nursing students is recommended.

      140 Character Summary: A principal component analysis supported the validity and reliability of the new Canadian Nurse Informatics Competency Assessment Scale.

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